A Mercy

Thoughts by Toni Morrison, Random House Audio 2008, 6 hours 26 minutes

Narrated by the author.

Challenge: For the Tournament of Winners  : Tournament of Books
Genre: African-American Lit
Type/Source: Audiobook/Audible 

WHAT’s it ABOUT:  A stream of consciousness by many women and few peripheral characters and the lives they lead. The ‘main’ characters are all connected to Jacob, a Dutch self-made man in the style of the American continent in the 1700s. It explores all variations of “institutions” – slavery, indentured servitude, marriage, religion.

WHAT’s GOOD: It’s powerful, evocative, tragic. Eye-opening to a period of history. Morrison does make it very real, truly makes it come alive.

 What’s NOT so good:  I had first thought that Morrison was an excellent narrator but as I continued to come back to ‘the listen’, I decided she does have a staccato style that might be irritating. I really didn’t notice it through most of the narrative. However, in story — I got lost a lot. Characters would switch and it was very unsteadying, distracting. The characters blurred together. By the time my mind switched accordingly as to who was talking, I was switched to another. And I would get stuck on who the person was talking TO; mother to child, girl to twin, young woman to lover.

FINAL THOUGHTS:  I am very glad to have had this book be presented to me. I wish I had co-listened and read and fortunately, the library had an ebook I could borrow and it helped a lot. I could almost count this as two reads because I practically started at the beginning and scanned to the last part. Read that and then listened. Ended with Morrison’s interview which was very helpful to my appreciation. Recommended.

RATING:  Four slices

No pie mentions noted. Unless you consider this, ~10%:

D’Ortega’s wife was a chatterin magpie, asking pointless questions —

 

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Copyright © 2007-2020. Care’s Books and Pie. All rights reserved. This post is an original post by Care from Care’s Online Book Club aka Care’s Books and Pie.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Round Two of Classics Club 50 Challenge

I have decided to create my second #CC50 list on goodreads.

Book List 2

My idea for this list is to keep adding to it any book that fits the criteria and if by the date when 5 years is up (in Dec 2024, I’ll have read at least 50 of them.

Sound good?   

Starting with Villette by Brontë, my first book of the year. However, it’s looking like I will finish Treasure Island before that.

 

Help! My enthusiasm for Villette is waning! it’s so long. ugh. I better come across a pie reference soon…

pierating

Copyright © 2007-2020. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post is an original post by Care from Care’s Online Book Club aka Care’s Books and Pie.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Signing up for the 2020 Back to the Classics Challenge

My selections here are mostly from my Classics Club 50 (<– Book List 1; I’m working on Book List 2) and are shown in RED.

Categories

1. 19th Century Classic. Any classic book originally published between 1800 and 1899.
2. 20th Century Classic. Any classic book originally published between 1900 and 1969.
 
3. Classic by a Woman Author.  
 
4. Classic in Translation. –  The Gateless Gate
5. Classic by a Person of Color. Any classic work by a non-white author. Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
6. A Genre Classic. Any classic novel that falls into a genre category — fantasy, science fiction, Western, romance, crime, horror, etc. The Time Machine 
7. Classic with a Person’s Name in the Title. First name, last name or both. – The Picture of Dorian Gray
 
8. Classic with a Place in the Title. Any classic with the proper name of a place (real or ficitonal) – a country, region, city, town, village, street, building, etc. – Villette by Charlotte Brontë
9. Classic with Nature in the Title. A classic with any element of nature in the title (not including animals). Treasure Island
10. Classic About a Family. This classic should have multiple members of the same family as principal characters, either from the same generation or multiple different generations.  They Were Sisters by Dorothy Whipple.
11. Abandoned Classic. Choose a classic that you started and just never got around to finishing, whether you didn’t like it at or just didn’t get around to it. Now is the time to give it another try. Alice in Wonderland or Tom Sawyer or Cry the Beloved Country 
12. Classic Adaptation. Any classic that’s been adapted as a movie or TV series. If you like, you can watch the adaptation and include your thoughts in your book review. It’s not required but it’s always fun to compare.  SO MANY CHOICES!
THE RULES: 
  • All books must have been written at least 50 years ago to qualify; therefore, books must have been published no later than 1969 for this challenge.

 

 

pierating

Copyright © 2007-2020. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post is an original post by Care from Care’s Online Book Club aka Care’s Books and Pie.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The Golden Notebook

Thoughts by Doris Lessing, Perennial Classics 1999 (orig 1962), 635 pages

Category  10. Classic From Africa, Asia, or Oceania (includes Australia). Any classic set in one of those contents or islands, or by an author from these countries.  Is one of my Classics Club 50, too.  AND What’s in a Name for the Precious Metal category…

I read this for a snail mail buddy read but it didn’t quite get traction. I don’t think my buddy finished it or maybe just didn’t say much about it. I don’t remember.
I read this at the end of May into June.
It is the longest book I read this year. It felt like it.
It is very odd. I don’t think I can give any kind of summary.
As Ruthiella has said and I paraphrase, “It is a slog at times; it is brilliant at times.”
It did have a lot of pie mentions.
The book cover above links to goodreads if you care to read the many varying reviews others have put there.
I gave it three slices of pie.
I really don’t remember all that much other than thinking the 1950s weren’t what we saw in TV sitcom reruns.
So how about some pie!
This is Crustless Cranberry Pie and I love this during the holidays – so festive and easy. And the grocers usually have cranberries in the produce section.
Varied from allrecipes.com:
1 cup all-purpose flour
not quite 1 cup white sugar (I usually try to use less than a recipe specifies)
1/4 tsp salt
2 cups cranberries – fresh, rinsed
1/2 cup walnuts – optional
1/2 cup melted butter
2 eggs, beaten
1 tsp almond extract (I use 1/4 tsp because this stuff is strong!)
Preheat to 350 degrees
Grease a glass or ceramic pie pan.
Combine flour, sugar, salt.
Stir in cranberries and nuts, toss to coat.
Stir in butter, eggs, and almond extract.
Spread the batter into the pan.
Bake for 40 minutes or until a wooden toothpick comes out clean.
Serve warm. or not. Great for breakfast the next day, too. No need to refrigerate.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2019. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Back to the Classics 2019 List Ideas

My selections here are mostly from my Classics Club 50 and are shown in RED.

Categories

1. 19th Century Classic. Any classic book originally published between 1800 and 1899. – The House of the Seven Gables – Nat Hawthorne 1851
2. 20th Century Classic. Any classic book originally published between 1900 and 1969. – The Ox-bow Incident by Walt VanTilberg Clark 1940
 
3. Classic by a Woman Author.  NANCY MITFORD’s LOVE IN A COLD CLIMATE
 
4. Classic in Translation. CANDIDE – Voltaire
5. Classic Comic Novel. Any comedy, satire, or humorous work. ?
6. Classic Tragic Novel. Tragedies traditionally have a sad ending… Hardy: Jude the Obscure
7. Very Long Classic. Any classic single work 500 pages or longer, not including introductions or end notes. – The Three Muskateers should work for this.
8. Classic Novella. Any work of narrative fiction shorter than 250 pages. – One Fine Day – Mollie Panter-Downes 179pp 1947
9. Classic From the Americas (includes the Caribbean). Includes classic set in either continent or the Caribbean, or by an author originally from one of those countries. – ?
10. Classic From Africa, Asia, or Oceania (includes Australia). Any classic set in one of those contents or islands, or by an author from these countries. – Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook?
11. Classic From a Place You’ve Lived. Read locally! Any classic set in a city, county, state or country in which you’ve lived, or by a local author. – The Age of Innocence / Wharton / Newport RI
12. Classic Play. Any play written or performed at least 50 years ago. Plays are eligible for this category only.  X
THE RULES: 
  • All books must have been written at least 50 years ago to qualify; therefore, books must have been published no later than 1969 for this challenge.

 

Maybe this year I will read at least 6 and achieve this Challenge for the first time!

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Copyright © 2007-2018. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Twelve Blog Post Ideas in a Trove

Ms. Bookish has challenged us to create a list of blog post ideas for those times when the well might be dry. Personally, I don’t have this problem very often, if ever. I always feel free to open a blank post template and start typing just to see what happens. Random is my friend.

But, since she is offering PRIZES! I thought I would try to generate a bunch of ideas, for “just in case”.

Here’s her EXPLAIN the TREASURE TROVE Challenge post.

1) A post to explain how unhappy I am about WordPress changing their ADD-NEW-POST style. Grrrrrrr.

2) The Tournament of Books hosted by The Morning News.

3) Most recent pie thoughts/activities.

4) Any book connections – those times when one book reminds you or is linked in some way to a book you’ve read previously or one you hope to read someday.

5) A vocabulary post – words recently discovered or tripped over that needed defining.

6) Try (search for) that blog post generator idea!  How fun.

7) Create a list of books that I think everyone should read.

8) Summary recap of challenge progress.

9) Summary recap of monthly/quarterly/whatever time period for books read, etc.

10) Explore the meme and weekly post ideas that others do:  Top Ten Tuesday, Sunday Whatever It Is, Monday What Are you Reading, etc.

11) Re-present a post from the past that I am proud of and/or revisit a book and my review to see if I still remember the book.

12) DO a link-love link up post – which in my case would probably be a highlight of other bloggers who do this well.

OK – that took my less than 10 minutes!  Feel free to borrow if any inspire you.

Oh, Belle also asks about thoughts on the generation process. Well, for me, similar to how I write posts, I just open up a blank post and let the fingers start typing up the words. I edit as I go. I don’t track my ideas. I do sometimes create draft posts of ideas and often of book reviews while reading the book – I get it all set up so that when I’m ready, all I have to do is write my impressions and not do the ‘add book cover’/tags, etc.

Have a great day! – hopefully I will soon be posting reviews of Even If the Sky Falls Down and Dept. of Speculation.

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Most Wonderful Time of the Year

It’s the most wonderful time of the year!

There’ll be challenges for reading
Cups of tea steaming
And reviewing out in the snow blogosphere
There’ll be scary political stories
And nonfiction tales of the glories of
Many good books – just come comment here!

It’s the most wonderful time of the year…

FOR SIGNING UP FOR CHALLENGES.

worldcitizenbutton

I’m committing to  this and to Eva, of A Striped Armchair, who will be the professor as I work towards a Minor in World Citizenship…    Be watching her blog for all the details!     She’ll be announcing a blog devoted to the challenge soon and her original post announcing it is  ==> here. <==

Hour 19 Mini-Challenge!

WORD / SENTENCE Challenge! 

The prize for this challenge is from the Read-A-Thon prize box…  and it will be TWO BOOKS!    other than that, I think Hannah is in charge.   YOU HAVE TWO HOURS.     and I think Dewey is randomly picking from the entries.   

Leave a comment OR blog yourself (you’re all doing both anyway, right?!)  for one or both (or neither?) of the following:

        A – strangest new vocabulary word found during entire read-a-thon

        B – most interesting /  annoying / favorite RUN ON sentence encountered.

 

Have fun!   Look alive PEOPLE!  

Whoops, I Did It Again

Well, I think I just bit off more than I intended to.  I signed up for another challenge.   What with Weekly Geeks, my In Their Own Shoes Challenge, keeping up with my favorite blogs (and finding more every day!) and actually spending time reading books just so I can review them here, I really think I might be in over my head.

But then again, I don’t want to get complacent, now DO I?

Besides, this one is ONLY asking for me to give a little more, only 1% more!   No, not quite.   It’s requesting we commit to reading 1% of the currently hot and debated 1001 Books List between May 1st and …    October?  or was it the end of the year?    

Yep, that’s what I did.  Signed up before I really knew what I was in for.

If you want to print the list, follow this link.    I did, I had to see it on paper.  On 20 pieces of paper.  I even printed it on green paper and had mad/crazy thoughts about transcribing the list into my tbr sug book!   I’m excited to see that I’ve read a few, heard of a few authors, etc.    Golly Ian McEwan is all over it.

If you want to be in the challenge, go here.

And, if you want to gently exhort me to “GET BACK TO YOUR BOOK(s) AND READ SOMETHING, SILLY!”   Well, that would be appreciated, too.

At first glance, I want to read these ten:

 1. Never Let Me Go – Kazuo Ishiguro (I have been wanting to try Ishiguro)

 2. Fury – Salman Rushdie (I have never read any Rushdie)

 3. American Pastoral – Philip Roth (I am compelled to read another Roth book.)

 4. Whatever – Michel Houellebecq (gotta love the title.   Maybe not)

 5. Trainspotting – Irvine Welsh (isn’t this a movie?!)

 6. Get Shorty – Elmore Leonard (I can always cheat and see the movies?) 

 7. Like Life – Lorrie Moore (I need to include a female writers, I think)

 8. Nights at the Circus (ooo, I like Angela Carter!)

 9. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie – Muriel Spark (has been on the list for awhile, might as well get to it.)

10.  Anna Karenina – Tolstoy (one of my 2008 must, gotta, absolutely want to finish this!)

alternates:   Ormond, The Absentee, or Castle Rackrent by Maria Edgeworth because I’ve never heard of her. 

If any of these are too long and thus intimidating, I’ll replace with a novella – there HAS to be a novella on this list somewhere!

 

PS – I spent a good ten minutes perusing Google Images to my search for ‘slap upside the head’ but didn’t find anything I wanted to bring back here.   Saw a few whale pics…