Something on a Sunday

Jenny of Reading the End has a new blog idea for Sundays. The idea is to share good things. To Quote Miss Gin-Jenny, “to talk about things that kept me moving forward or gave me some joy.” I’m borrowing a few of her categories for inspiration:

Touched by:  Even though I’ve bombarded my Facebook timeline lately with a lot of posts about my wedding anniversary, it really does surprise me how many people LIKE or HEART or leave a comment “Happy Anniversary”. IF you want to share in that joy, you must know that D and I went to see Badfinger as part of our wedded-bliss celebration. AND THUS, you must tell me which of Badfinger’s songs is your favorite! Here’s a link to help you if you can’t remember any… (and no, I was young when this band was ‘hot’ – I’m not THAT old… just sayin’.)

Happy about: All the little things I’ve gotten done this weekend. Saw a friend for shopping and lunch, walked the dogs for a few miles each day, packed/organized/cleaned.  You know, all the stuff you feel better having done but only after you’ve done it.

Self-cared for: Ice cream? I found Talenti on sale and bought the Vanilla Chai flavor. It’s actually gelato.

Proud of: My job, so far. I’m challenged, inspired, proud, energized. Never thought I could say that about a job and I’m hoping this isn’t just the honeymoon phase, but I do think it is going very very well. (I’m conducting leadership training and helping with the strategy for the department. I get to apply my tech skills and also ‘facilitate’ training (get up in front of people!) and help, just possibly, share a new thought and/or make their day a little brighter.)

Looking forward to: Tomorrow’s announcement of the Tournament of Books Long List. I think I’ll only have read one but I’m still thrilled!

and pie. This should be a pie-riffic week!

Have a great Thanksgiving! I’m thankful for this blog, this little corner that is mine, but mostly for the kind and caring book blogging community and the opportunity to be a part of it. Thank you for visiting. I appreciate you.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.
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October, the Tenth Month, Five More Books

I read books in October. Let me tell ya!

Oct 2017

The Magician’s Assistant / Ann Patchett A (1997,11′) *** 74

Textbook / Amy Krause Rosenthal HB (2016,368) **** 73

Lila / Marilynne Robinson A (2014,9′) **** 72

One Good Turn / Kate Atkinson Tb (2016,448) **** 71

Angle of Repose / Wallace Stegner Tb (1971,569) **** 70

Two audiobooks –  so nice to get back to this medium. My new job often has me traveling so I have some car time. Plus the commute home is 30-40 minutes (which I expect will be on the longer side since I have to traverse the shopping district avenues which get congested this time of year.) With no traffic, I can get TO work in just over 15 minutes!

Let’s start:  I read Angle of Repose because* I so very much enjoyed the first Stegner I treated myself to: (and click on this:  –>  to read my review) Crossing to Safety. AofR won the Pulitzer, doncha know, and as impressive an epic it is, I enjoyed Crossing to Safety more. That said, Angle is impressive. Oh, I said that. It’s full of big ideas and some great fabulous looks into our American History, the western expansion. Recommended if you like amazing writing, complicated characters and sweeping views of history. It was set in the late sixties, yet Stegner writes with a freshness that is … impressive. It felt fresh and not as someone now writing about then. Does that make sense? Hey, it’s my opinion. Golly gee, I miss blogging and putting myself OUT THERE! wee hoo. yee haw. [Rabbit pie and cowpie.]

Stegner is not talked about enough.

*     I also read Angle of Repose because I have an engineering degree and the term suggests ‘engineering‘. Not at all to suggest  to not-engineering geeks (so do not assume!) that this is science-heavy aka boring!! it is not. Please please don’t think that. ugh.

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One Good Turn. I read this because…. LOTS of reasons! I love this author. I really enjoyed her first Brodie book and this is the second with this main character. whoops, maybe only 2 reasons. I found this book at my apartment complex! It was on the community shelf. Had to grab. I returned it (though not to the same spot.)

If you liked Case Histories, I can tell you to go ahead read this, too, if you haven’t  yet. To click on this sentence, you will be transported to my goodreads notes for  Case Histories because I didn’t review it here (on blog.) What a sad blogging summer I had… [I’m counting egg custard as ‘pie’.]

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Lila. Oh Lila! What a fascinating amazing story. This month was chock full of the best author visits; now that I think about it, all return visits to these authors. What a comfortable heart-full reading month I have had this October. If you are like me and appreciate the soul-singing work of Marilynne Robinson (and can I only say to any of you  that don’t have the same kind of spiritual ‘relationship’ that this author might espouse – all cool. I get it. I really don’t either at this moment in my life but wow oh wow do I appreciate what she does in her writing.) I want to put all of MR’s Gilead books on my “to-read-again all-at-once in-order someday list”. I’m mentally creating this list of books to read and probably need to create it in goodreads, right? Right. Will do…

NOT to suggest that listening to Lila‘s side of things was ‘comfortable’. Soul-singing provocative spiritual stuff is never comfortable. [Apple Pie]

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Textbook by Amy Krause.

Dear Reader, do you know of this? Feel free to click on the link just provided and read about it from the goodreads perspective.

I just want to start crying. Whoa.

Thank you Bybee for sending me this. I still have it. I want to send it to SOMEONE but don’t know who. Also, I don’t know if I want it to leave me. It could very well be all gimmick-schmimmick until life(/death) thrusts into the ‘plan’ and shows no guarantees.

Wow.

(sniff, gulp. sob…)

[yes, pie… It was THIS that broke my freakin’ heart.]

Live, people. Don’t watch the crap on the news, hug your loved ones, recognize the humanity in every person, strive to be better and LIVE, goddammit. (talking to myself?)

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The Magician’s Assistant. Ann Patchett you nutty adorable author book-store-owner lovely lady YOU. Love ya. Not your best book but that’s OK, I’m sure you learned much from the experience (of course you did, goofy-me. ha) and so glad you kept after the craft. I am still not sure the narrator captured Nebraska small town, but hey, “Whatever.” This is the author that inspires me, delights me, makes me think and entertains. One of my favorites.

I’ll forgive the no pie thing. This time.

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Copyright © 2007-2016. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

 

August, You Were a Friend of Mine

August, You Were a Friend of Mine

Here’s my list from August:
The Grand Sophy / Georgette Heyer eB (1950,387) ***** 61
The Silent Wife / Kerry Fisher eB (2017,352) ** DNF 60
The Almost Sisters / Joshilyn Jackson ARC Tb (2017,339) **** 59
The Nightingale / Kristin Hannah Tb (2015,440) *** 58
Finders Keepers / Stephen King pb (2015,448) **** 57
Wake in Winter / Ndezhda Belenkaya eB (2016,368) ** DNF 56

Reviews, out of order…

I DNF’d Wake in Winter and The Silent Wife. I remember that Wake in Winter got off to a very clunky start with drastic change of tone and perspective of voice. Is the author talking or the character? Very abrupt. And… as always, when I get that distracting voice in my head that starts to question what is the what, I do looking for reviews. I found many critical negative reviews and it solidified my need to give it up. I can’t even remember what made me give up on The Silent Wife. Wow, nope, I don’t remember and don’t feel necessary to go find out. I’m sure I had good reasons. Feel free to click on the titles to go see the books in goodreads and do your own research.

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I’ve already mentioned elsewhere on the bookish social media outlets that I have an allergy to Kristin Hannah. I’m sure she is lovely and she is obviously held in high esteem by her fans and that is great. I just don’t like her style of writing. I do appreciate her giving attention to the amazing women who resisted the Nazis in WW2 and for that, The Nightingale gets three slices of pie. Bonus Apple Pie.

Another issue I had with The Nightingale was that the copy I purchased from Target had 40 pages missing!!! I kept reading and have decided I didn’t miss a thing. I was able to return the book for credit which I immediately used to buy another book.

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Stephen King’s Finders Keepers was that book. This is second in the Bill Hodges trilogy. I liked it. I tagged it as having a pie mention but will look it up another time.  (I read book #3 in September…)

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I very much enjoyed the humor and writing in The Almost Sisters. I think Joshilyn Jackson has talent. The story, at times, had a few things that made me cringe (like why do we think we have to rush the old people into a home! GEEEEESH) but otherwise, I thought the main character has some fun things going for her and she made me laugh. Maybe made me cry, too. I don’t remember that part but it might have had some heart tugs. Bonus pie mentions: ice pie, church pie, the making of pie crusts.

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And the BEST OF AUGUST! is Georgette Heyer’s The Grand Sophy. Fun stuff and always a vocabulary booster. If you like strong women in times that never expected strong women, these are a treat. Keep in mind, some character depictions will/may offend today’s sensibilities.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

July, July! What I’d Give to Be Back in July!

TropStorm Jose won’t leave. He was scheduled to rock Rhode Island on Tuesday but each day the winds seem more gusty and blowy and chilling. I walk the dogs through scattered leaves; I wrap in blankets; I’m sipping hot chocolate.

screech! Cancel that last one. I’m still enjoying beer but we’ve moved from the Shandies to Octoberfests. sigh….

Here’s the quick list of what I read in July:

The Sweet Hereafter / Russell Banks eB (1991,416) **** 55
Perfect / Rachel Joyce eB (2013,401) **** 54
NOS4A2 / Joe Hill eB (2013,704) *** 53
Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald / TAFowler Tb (2013,384) **** 52
On the Occasion of My Last Afternoon / Kaye Gibbons eB (1998,304) *** 51
Code Name Verity / Elizabeth Wein eB (2012,452) ***** 50

 

I loved Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein! There’s been some interesting chatter about its being classified as YA which I didn’t get. I always think of YA as being about younger characters and about youngster drama – even if extremely heavy AND also written with a feel like it was written for a younger reader than I am. (cough, cough). Now saying this “didn’t feel YA” is not meant to be any kind of lesser/more qualifier or criticism. I just never got that YA sense from it. Perhaps because it was set in WW2? I would say that The Book Thief – another one I love – IS YA but I wouldn’t say it about Code Name Verity. Yes, the two main characters were youthful but it didn’t feel like a story set up to be told to the YA typical audience.

Here’s more twist to this topic. I did think The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah most certainly had that YA feel. The Nightingale character and her experiences fit the YA criteria to a tee for YA for me. I liked Code Name MUCH MUCH more. I thought the writing quality was much higher but I do not think that has anything to do with any YA classification. Am I fooling myself?

I gave three stars to On the Occasion of My Last Afternoon because I really am not sure what to make of it. Bonus: pie! quote: “I was irritated that it might be the old lady who peddled stale pies.”

Moving on to books about wives of famous authors… I DNF’d The Paris Wife. Hadley drove me crazy. I loved Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald and when ever Hadley made an appearance — I still found her annoying.  Bonus: Chocolate Cream Pie!

My first read by author Joe Hill was The Fireman and I was eager to try something else. I actually had purchased NOS4A2 for my Kindle months before The Fireman-along was announced and I was eager to get to it because I so enjoyed the readalong. I liked NOS4A2 and it wasn’t quite as scary horrific as I thought it was going to be –  maybe I’m building up some kind of tolerance after so many King books…. (And it was Christmas in July! if you’ve read this, you’ll know what I mean.)    Bonus: Banana Pie!

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Perfect by Rachel Joyce. I really like Rachel Joyce. I had a tough time with Perfect. I ended up giving it 4 stars because of the skill of Rachel Joyce. She had me uncomfortably anxious, a low-level strumming sense of foreboding. This was a sad book. “You have to think bigger than what you know,”           Bonus: Mince pie!

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As I go through this list, I see many sad reads. The Sweet Hereafter was as sad as they come. Read it if you like sad books? if you like how competent some authors are with sad material? I don’t know. It was about a school bus full of children hitting an ice patch while proceeding down a hill and crashing into a pond off a steep embankment. Told from multiple character viewpoints. I’m getting weepy and sad thinking about it again. But Banks has my respect. It was well done. Four slices of pie.

Abbott says, “Biggest … difference … between … people … is … quality … of … attention.” And since a person’s quality of attention is one of the few things about her that a human can control, then she damn well better do it, say I. Put that together with the Golden Rule in a nutshell, and you’ve got my philosophy of life. Abbott’s too. And you don’t need religion for it.


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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

June Feels So Far Away

I read ten books in June and I don’t feel guilty at all that it is now September when I finally update y’all on that fact.

If you were at all curious, you would be checking my BOOKS READ page and seeing what is up. I do seem to keep that current. I also am quite up-to-date on goodreads. I also enjoy posting on Litsy, if you like that book + photo app. Oh, I haven’t gone away entirely. I’m on Twitter quite often. It’s just that blogging requires more technical accessibility than I usually have – I prefer to write posts on my laptop which requires WiFi and that is truly a pain in the ass to “make right”. WiFi access is spotty at best. I don’t even want to go into it.

Here’s my June list:

June 2017 (10)
The Atomic Weight of Love / Elizabeth Church eB (2016,320) **** 49
Lab Girl / Hope Jahren Tb (2016,290) ***** 48
Dark Matter / Blake Crouch eB (2016,342) **** 47
Case Histories / Kate Atkinson eB (2005,389) **** 46
Blindness / Jose Saramago Tb (1999,326) **** 45
Being God eB (2013,222) *** 44
Being Mortal HB (2014,282) **** 43
Godspeed eB *** (2012,406) 42
Everything I Never Told You A  (2014,10′) *** 41
Kitchens of the Great Midwest eB (2015,310) **** 40 apple pie

Lifted copy/paste from my Books Read page (see menu above), I realize I haven’t even yet provided the minimal info I usually do! Uh oh. I will, I suppose, probably, eventually, go back and fill that stuff in. But let’s just randomly chat about what this list provokes thought-wise in my head. Here goes.

I liked Atomic Weight of Love. It was… odd, in some ways, very mature and almost bitter in some ways. Not quite chick lit, weighty even, if you don’t mind. Feministish history, I might say. Read it if the synopsis appeals. I won’t tell more. Go to gr and decide for yourself. It did feel like a debut of a smart woman who has seen some things who wanted to write a book. I would read more by this author. I really don’t know if I’m right about that and should probably shut up.

Segue… AWoL featured an ambitious female scientist: see next book:

LAB GIRL!  I loved it, the geek in me loved it. Not quite what I expected but that is OK. I don’t mind surprises. It is one of those surprises that makes me curious of what I *DID* expect. A wonderment, really. Every time I see a tree chopped down, I think of this book.

Dark Matter is my kind of thriller! geeky for sure. Time travel awesome. I thought I read that a movie was in the works but I could find NO EVIDENCE of such on IMDB. #shrug

Case Histories for the WIN. I do think I have a crush on author Kate Atkinson. I think/hope this is a standalone but first in the series. I can get behind a series that is standalone with same characters so I just might (probably) seek out book #2 of the Brodie guy.

Blindness was disturbing. This is one of these oddly punctuated books (I think?) Did I not read that somewhere? I already gave away my copy and don’t recall what I did with it… Anyway, I NEVER, repeat RARELY notice punctuation oddities in a book if the story is gripping. I can only shudder… this is one helluva disturbing tale. I don’t think I want to see the movie.

Being God just wasn’t my kind of book. Pretty sure I skimmed/skipped my way through it. Middle school coming of age stuff.

Three months later I don’t even remember what Being Mortal was about. OH! Nonfiction about medicine and our not-great response to aging and attempting to prolong life far beyond when we should. By Atul Guwande. It was OK, not as great as I expected. Not sure why or what I expected but I didn’t find any advice in this like I had hoped.

And now I’m blanking on Godspeed. Something about clocks. Something about a kid being upset about a few missing seconds on a world clock reset? I might be thinking about an entirely different book. Due diligence should make me go clarify so someone isn’t steered astray… Yea, maybe later. Do your own research on this book!!!  [Correct, confusing with something else. This is a steampunk romance. Enjoyable but not memorable.]

I did not like Everything I Never Told You and I like the author. I follow and admire the author on Twitter. I did not or sadly could not find an emotional appreciation/connection to this book. I gave it three stars because of pie mentions.

Kitchens of the Great Midwest was terrific! I really enjoyed it. I was saddened to followup with reviews to find many friends did NOT like this or read a review that convinced them they would not like it so are crossing off lists! I REALLY liked this book and found much that appealed to my reading emotional self. It’s all just crazy. That’s OK. Too each their own. But I would LOVE to make J____ read this and change her mind and then sit and discuss over wine….  (Wow – I don’t usually try twist peoples arms to read a book but it somehow keeps poppin up in my recall that she is thinking this won’t appeal to her…  I think that what one reviewer found annoying, I found tongue-in-cheek amusing, so it made me chuckle where the other person reacted with DNF and/or chucking the book across the room. Funny, huh.

Maybe I will post soon about the 6 books I read in July and/or the 6 books I read in August!

Here’s the photo of the sky on one of our recent boat rides:

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Dublin Literary Pub Crawl

Thoughts          by Colm Quilligan, Writers’ Island 4th Ed 2017 (orig 2008), 160 pages

The story of Dublin pubs and the writers they served.

Challenge: Tour Dublin
Genre: Travel, Literary Travel!!
Type/Source: Tradeback / purchased directly from the author
 Why I read this now: Cuz I bought it from the source AT the source.

MOTIVATION for READING: To see if I really saw Dublin as I hope to have seen it. (yea, not quite, dammit.)

WHAT’s it ABOUT: This book is a guide to all the cool literary places to visit in Dublin! It is NOT the thing to buy on your last day in Dublin. It is preferable to read before setting foot in Dublin but not too far in advance probably (based on ME, cuz I am really horrible about reading stuff pre-visit to places. (What is really crazy is that I can replay that in my head in an Irish accent but I suck at an Irish-accent-attempt live.))

WHAT’s GOOD: Pretty pictures! Slick copy! Cool places! MUST. GET. BACK. TO DUBLIN. Guinness really does taste better in Dublin. Sigh.

This book is packed with places (with addresses – good), photos, interesting tidbits, famous people and other people that may not be known to everyone, fascinating history, etc etc etc. The index is extensive, too, which I know will impress the fussiest of nonfiction-lovers. And a bibliography!

If you read yesterday’s post on Delaney’s Dublin book, you’ll know about The Bailey pub and maybe could tell that it doesn’t look ‘old’. Interesting bit: Delaney lamented that 7 Eccles Street was not a stop on any tour (he does give quite a bit of history why Joyce chose that address in Ulysses) and now Quilligan explains more:

The Bailey was part of the Brown Thomas department store building, which was bough by Marks and Spencer in 1994. The pub and landmark restaurant were closed and quickly gutted, prompting a controversy about where to put the door of 7 Eccles Street, the fictional home of Leopold Bloom (the door had been part of the foyer of the Bailey). Thankfully, the door found a new home at the James Joyce Centre on North Great Georges Street, where it enhance the excellent permanent exhibition that transferred there from the National Library.

We didn’t get to the Joyce Centre on Great Georges. #sadface. I also failed to find the statue of Joyce that was supposed to be on one of the main boulevards, according to the map. I was riding the bus, camera ready and failed to spot it, I guess.

What’s NOT so good: That feeling of wanting to turn around and go back to Dublin immediately because I read this on the plane ride back to America. 

FINAL THOUGHTS: Must go back, all there is to it. I follow some cool Twitter pages for promoting Dublin and I just yesterday saw a place I want to go visit that isn’t in this book and now I’m wondering just how big is that town?!

Highly recommended you read this prior to your trip and also enjoy the actual Pub Crawl when you get there.  The Crawl is lively and informative with song and ditties and opportunities to taste a beverage or two; but gives only just a little slice of what can be discovered with this book.

RATING: Four slices of pie; Guinness Beef Pie or and even a Guinness Chocolate Cherry Pie? No pie mentioned (or I missed it?)

 

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Links Roundup LitPie-Style

Hello,

I’m going to try and create a links round-up of the fun and feisty articles and posts from around the web.  Scratch that, “there is no try”, let’s do it!

My first entry is from a 7th grade Reading teacher in Wisconsin. She’s a go-getter and I am always inspired by her words and ideas. This time, she’s explaining how she introduces POETRY to her students. And since 2017 is Care’s Year of Poetry, I had to share.

A great quote: “You are a 10-year-old explaining to a theoretical physicist how time travel might work.” Did you know I can’t resist a good time-travel book?  Now go read this article if you are interested in actively participating in the Anti-Racism Campaign.

Favorite book bloggers who post about pie!  Rhapsody Jill and Stefanie of So Many Books. Did I miss anyone?

Another fun pi + pie video.

Link to The Morning News Tournament of Books 2017 because I can’t get enough of it so there.

NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE ANNOUNCES WINNERS FOR 2016 AWARDS!!!!!   (Link to Finalists Announcement. Curious that there were two books about loneliness in the Criticism category? I am. Has anyone read a book in this category? Again, me = curious)

Occasionally, I’ll google-search for “Pies in Literature” or some such nonsense just to see what comes up. This blog (ME!) shows up in SECOND SPOT for today’s look-see at what the webs are finding. Nothing too recent, but there are actual articles from 2015 about finding pie in a certain book. Fun, right? oh yea.

Savvy Verse and Wit has the Monthly Poetry Challenge Sign Up ready. I admit, I’m delighted every time I see a bit of poetry somewhere, here and there. I still don’t quite know how I should track my 100 poems in 2017 but I am proud of what progress I am building towards an awareness and appreciation for how poetry can impact a day in a good way.

Shout out to other bloggers who do EXCELLENT with providing Link Up posts:  Jenny who always reads the ends of books first, and, and, and…  I couldn’t find any recents ones so please provide me your suggestions!  Thanks.

Finally, a poem about pie:

(click on the image to go to the poet’s Twitter page…)

Have a great weekend!  I’ll have Dublin and Joyce books to chat about next week. I need to get back to reading books…  I need to read The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George by Tuesday.
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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The 2017 Attempt to Complete The Back to the Classics Challenge

Back to the Classics 2017 – click the button below for our host Karen’s rules for the Challenge:

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The categories for the 2016 Back to the Classics Challenge: My choices in RED but if this goes like last year, I won’t read any of my original selections! eeek.

1.  A 19th century classic – any book published between 1800 and 1899. Probably a Trolloppe. or a Hardy.

2.  A 20th century classic – any book published between 1900 and 1967. Rabbit, Run

3.  A classic by a woman author. Cold Comfort Farm or Orlando

4.  A classic in translation. The Three Muskateers or Love in a Fallen City

5.  A classic published before 1800. Plays and epic poems are acceptable in this category. Candide!!

6.  A romance classic. Jude the Obscure?

7.  A Gothic or horror classic. Jane Eyre.

8.  A classic with a number in the title. One Fine Day 

9.  A classic about an animal or which includes the name of an animal in the title. The Bird’s Nest

10. A classic set in a place you’d like to visit. Love in a Cold Climate (whatever/whereever – will likely be English…)

11. An award-winning classic. ??? Will look at the Pulitzer list. Perhaps The Voice at the Back Door by Elizabeth Spencer. Uh, NOPE. Is listed on that page but I didn’t realize the award was NOT given that year. So maybe The Keepers of the House by Shirley Ann Grau, 1965.

12. A Russian classic. Memories by Teffi, as suggested by Ruthiella. Or Dead Souls by Gogol?

Happy Challenge-Reading!

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Getting Ready for TOB 2017

And so it begins…   Tournament of Books 2017

When you search online for “Tournament of Books Rooster“, you will get the final results from last year’s contest. But if you search “TOB Rooster Long List 2017” you should find the list of 120 books published in 2016  that we all must read before March.

HA ha ha ha ha,… sniff, SOB.

Yes, I cried. A little.sobemoji

You don’t really have to do that searching because I linked ’em up for you. I’m nice like that. Though, if you do want to search for that second list, you’ll get a results option for reading about the best toaster ovens in 2017. Gotta love the internet…

And the nice folk at The Morning News provides a link to a spreadsheet in case you want to print and check the thing off with a highlighter and colored pens and have a paper copy to fondle and hold and a hug and put in a notebook like I have. I had been despairing about a printable list when I realized that I didn’t read the ENTIRE post (thus missed the bit about a spreadsheet – I’m so lame.) Also, I like the Facebook Rooster page to keep track of news on this wonderful favorite event.

I am providing a list with my reviews of the books I’ve read so far in order of my most favorite to almost but not quite favorite — because all have been enjoyable or moving or startling or… Um, after the top two, I couldn’t really put the other 4 in any ranking! (Book covers link to my reviews. Pie mentions noted.)

 

My Name is Lucy Barton mnilbbyes by Elizabeth Strout * Elvis Pie

Commonwealth cwbyapby Ann Patchett * Apple Pie

The Fireman tfbyjh by Joe Hill * Peach Pie

The Vegetarian tvbyhk by Han Kang, translated by Deborah Smith

The Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist yhismtsoafbysy by Sunil Yapa

The Nest tnbycda by Cynthia d’Aprix Sweeney

 

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OWNED on Kindle but not yet read:  Mr. Splitfoot by Samantha Hunt

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Requested from the library:

Alexander Chee’s The Queen of the Night – position in line:  1

Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing – position in line: 2

Jacqueline Woodson’s Another Brooklyn – position in line: 3

Brit Bennett’s The Mothers – position in line: 5

Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad – position in line: 62

pieratingsmlHave you read any that I haven’t and you think will make the shortlist? TELL ME! And let me know if any of these are excellent audiobooks. Thanks, most appreciated. Let’s get reading, people!  We’ve got a tournament to prep for.

 

Copyright © 2007-2016. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

All About the Months

Thoughts aatmbymrk by Maymie R Krythe, Harper and Row 1966, 222 pages

Challenge:  What’s in a Name Challenge : Month Category
Genre:  Reference/Nonfiction
Type/Source:  Hardback / from a discarded book bin
 Why I read this now: Had to finish up the Challenge!

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MOTIVATION for READING:   Again, for the Challenge.

Here’s what goodreads.com has to say (and it is noted that it is from the book jacket which has been lost with my edition.)

After exploring every possible source of information–fact and fable–on the months, Mrs. Krythe writes as authoritatively about this subject as she did about Christmas and American holidays in two earlier books. In her own pithy prose, and with borrowed lines from early and contemporary poets, the author gives the special characteristics of each month, such as how it was named, the number of days it originally contained, and when and how changes came about.
Much of the book is devoted to the months’ symbolic jewels, from precious stones to the fabulous 44.5 carat “Hope” diamond; and flowers, from the common little field daisy to the most resplendent rose. Their origins and their often bewitching roles in history are all here.
Important events that have taken place in each century and in every country are related here. Famous statesmen, royalty, dignitaries, actors, sports figures, and other personalities whose birthdays fall in a given month are mentioned. All about the Months is a storehouse of information that makes fascinating reading for everyone, and will surely prove a boon to those who plan programs built around the months of the year.

WHAT’s GOOD:  I think it fun to read books from earlier times (pub’d in 1966, mind you) to reflect on what has changed. And what hasn’t. She actually mentions what we would now call climate change!

Even though for centuries December has been regarded as a time of hard frosts and heavy snowstorms, in recent years conditions have changed in some localities, and milder weather has prevailed.

What’s NOT so good: It was a slog to sit and attempt to read as a straight-through text, but enjoyable enough to dip in a little at a time and check out month by month as the mood hit. It was interesting to see who she considered ‘famous people’ in the listings for each month’s birthdays and notable happenings:

… and in February 1962, the orbital flight of Lt. Col. John H. Glenn made news.  (RIP John Glenn, American Hero of the Space Age)

The only U.S. President born in June was George HW Bush… Whatever that might mean, but I had to look. When Mrs. Krythe wrote this book, she states, “June is the only month of the twelve in which no President was born.” And we will soon get to add Donald Trump (born June 14). Of which I am still in utter disbelief.

FINAL THOUGHTS:  I admit to being fascinated by this “Mrs. Krythe” and was inspired to search for more author information; only to find… nothing. Absolutely nothing. I suppose I need the skills of a librarian and more than just Google. Maymie R. written other books that explore holidays, specific holidays and songs (probably holiday songs!) and I even found a reference to an article she wrote for the Historical Society of Southern California. She had to have been a hit at parties. But where is she now? Who was she married to? Did she have any children? Why do I care?

Recommended as a reference text, for quips and historical notes, especially any information about flowers and jewels relative to their calendar importance and then some. (Though, I got confused reading about the Hope Diamond.)

RATING:  Three slices of pie (I didn’t find any mention of pie but that’s because I am grossly over-exaggerating my claim to have COMPLETED this…  oh well. Sue me.)

 

 

pierating

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