Something on a Sunday

Jenny of Reading the End has a new blog idea for Sundays. The idea is to share good things. To Quote Miss Gin-Jenny, “to talk about things that kept me moving forward or gave me some joy.” I’m borrowing a few of her categories for inspiration:

Touched by:  Even though I’ve bombarded my Facebook timeline lately with a lot of posts about my wedding anniversary, it really does surprise me how many people LIKE or HEART or leave a comment “Happy Anniversary”. IF you want to share in that joy, you must know that D and I went to see Badfinger as part of our wedded-bliss celebration. AND THUS, you must tell me which of Badfinger’s songs is your favorite! Here’s a link to help you if you can’t remember any… (and no, I was young when this band was ‘hot’ – I’m not THAT old… just sayin’.)

Happy about: All the little things I’ve gotten done this weekend. Saw a friend for shopping and lunch, walked the dogs for a few miles each day, packed/organized/cleaned.  You know, all the stuff you feel better having done but only after you’ve done it.

Self-cared for: Ice cream? I found Talenti on sale and bought the Vanilla Chai flavor. It’s actually gelato.

Proud of: My job, so far. I’m challenged, inspired, proud, energized. Never thought I could say that about a job and I’m hoping this isn’t just the honeymoon phase, but I do think it is going very very well. (I’m conducting leadership training and helping with the strategy for the department. I get to apply my tech skills and also ‘facilitate’ training (get up in front of people!) and help, just possibly, share a new thought and/or make their day a little brighter.)

Looking forward to: Tomorrow’s announcement of the Tournament of Books Long List. I think I’ll only have read one but I’m still thrilled!

and pie. This should be a pie-riffic week!

Have a great Thanksgiving! I’m thankful for this blog, this little corner that is mine, but mostly for the kind and caring book blogging community and the opportunity to be a part of it. Thank you for visiting. I appreciate you.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.
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October, the Tenth Month, Five More Books

I read books in October. Let me tell ya!

Oct 2017

The Magician’s Assistant / Ann Patchett A (1997,11′) *** 74

Textbook / Amy Krause Rosenthal HB (2016,368) **** 73

Lila / Marilynne Robinson A (2014,9′) **** 72

One Good Turn / Kate Atkinson Tb (2016,448) **** 71

Angle of Repose / Wallace Stegner Tb (1971,569) **** 70

Two audiobooks –  so nice to get back to this medium. My new job often has me traveling so I have some car time. Plus the commute home is 30-40 minutes (which I expect will be on the longer side since I have to traverse the shopping district avenues which get congested this time of year.) With no traffic, I can get TO work in just over 15 minutes!

Let’s start:  I read Angle of Repose because* I so very much enjoyed the first Stegner I treated myself to: (and click on this:  –>  to read my review) Crossing to Safety. AofR won the Pulitzer, doncha know, and as impressive an epic it is, I enjoyed Crossing to Safety more. That said, Angle is impressive. Oh, I said that. It’s full of big ideas and some great fabulous looks into our American History, the western expansion. Recommended if you like amazing writing, complicated characters and sweeping views of history. It was set in the late sixties, yet Stegner writes with a freshness that is … impressive. It felt fresh and not as someone now writing about then. Does that make sense? Hey, it’s my opinion. Golly gee, I miss blogging and putting myself OUT THERE! wee hoo. yee haw. [Rabbit pie and cowpie.]

Stegner is not talked about enough.

*     I also read Angle of Repose because I have an engineering degree and the term suggests ‘engineering‘. Not at all to suggest  to not-engineering geeks (so do not assume!) that this is science-heavy aka boring!! it is not. Please please don’t think that. ugh.

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One Good Turn. I read this because…. LOTS of reasons! I love this author. I really enjoyed her first Brodie book and this is the second with this main character. whoops, maybe only 2 reasons. I found this book at my apartment complex! It was on the community shelf. Had to grab. I returned it (though not to the same spot.)

If you liked Case Histories, I can tell you to go ahead read this, too, if you haven’t  yet. To click on this sentence, you will be transported to my goodreads notes for  Case Histories because I didn’t review it here (on blog.) What a sad blogging summer I had… [I’m counting egg custard as ‘pie’.]

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Lila. Oh Lila! What a fascinating amazing story. This month was chock full of the best author visits; now that I think about it, all return visits to these authors. What a comfortable heart-full reading month I have had this October. If you are like me and appreciate the soul-singing work of Marilynne Robinson (and can I only say to any of you  that don’t have the same kind of spiritual ‘relationship’ that this author might espouse – all cool. I get it. I really don’t either at this moment in my life but wow oh wow do I appreciate what she does in her writing.) I want to put all of MR’s Gilead books on my “to-read-again all-at-once in-order someday list”. I’m mentally creating this list of books to read and probably need to create it in goodreads, right? Right. Will do…

NOT to suggest that listening to Lila‘s side of things was ‘comfortable’. Soul-singing provocative spiritual stuff is never comfortable. [Apple Pie]

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Textbook by Amy Krause.

Dear Reader, do you know of this? Feel free to click on the link just provided and read about it from the goodreads perspective.

I just want to start crying. Whoa.

Thank you Bybee for sending me this. I still have it. I want to send it to SOMEONE but don’t know who. Also, I don’t know if I want it to leave me. It could very well be all gimmick-schmimmick until life(/death) thrusts into the ‘plan’ and shows no guarantees.

Wow.

(sniff, gulp. sob…)

[yes, pie… It was THIS that broke my freakin’ heart.]

Live, people. Don’t watch the crap on the news, hug your loved ones, recognize the humanity in every person, strive to be better and LIVE, goddammit. (talking to myself?)

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The Magician’s Assistant. Ann Patchett you nutty adorable author book-store-owner lovely lady YOU. Love ya. Not your best book but that’s OK, I’m sure you learned much from the experience (of course you did, goofy-me. ha) and so glad you kept after the craft. I am still not sure the narrator captured Nebraska small town, but hey, “Whatever.” This is the author that inspires me, delights me, makes me think and entertains. One of my favorites.

I’ll forgive the no pie thing. This time.

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Copyright © 2007-2016. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

 

Books I Read in September 2017

This title might be boring but it is accurate…

Yep, I read a few books in September. I read 6 fiction books, one play and a nonfiction-self help book.

Slade House by David Mitchell **** 69
Waiting for Godot / Beckett (1950,) *** 68
Run / Ann Patchett HB (2007,295) ***** 67
The Fifth Sense / NK Jemisin Tb (2015,468) **** 66
Rising Strong / Brené Brown Tb (2015,) **** 65
What Alice Forgot / Liane Moriarty Tb (2012,466) **** 64
End of Watch / Stephen King pb (2016,432) *** 63
The Essex Serpent / Sarah Perry HB (2017,422) **** 62

You know what else I did in September?  I interviewed for the second time/received and offer to ‘work’ an accepted/arranged to begin a new job! (Warning that my October reading count will be low…) *

Let’s get to this! Are you ready? I’m really not, which is why I keep typing rather than getting on with it…**

The Essex Serpent was … interesting. I did like it, I did. I liked a lot about it and yet. You want to know what this book reminded me of? Not in content but in style. It reminded me of — and this is me RIGHT NOW – I didn’t think of this while I read it but it has been subtly slowly brewing in my subconscious – it reminds me of

.

.

.

[Interjection here – bear with me. (hee hee, I almost typed ‘bare with me’! made me laugh.]

So, I’m interjecting here to add in the postscripts.

*      this was to let you know that I typed some of this post in October and now it is Nov 8 and I’m getting back to it. Yep – October counts were low… I *DID* start a new job in October! (it’s going well, thanks for asking)

**      this double-star on the sentence to let’s-get-on-with-it, is again to tell you that I obviously didn’t…, and

 

I give up. Should I have started over? I sent The Essex Serpent to Bybee. She should like it.

Waiting for Godot is Irish!*** It’s short!! I have wanted to understand all the references once stumbles upon when circulating in literate societies and now I think I can say, “I get it.”  By which I mean, I get the references. I may not have ‘got’ the play. It’s a toughie.

***       I went to Ireland in March of this year and toured an exhibit at the National Museum on Beckett… I sent this to Amy.

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I read RUN by Ann Patchett and can’t remember a thing. What WAS this? [thinking/checking in on goodreads…] OH! I REMEMBER!!  Set in Boston, an adoption, liberal politician, struggling mom, talented daughter, lives collide whether wanted or not, kind of story. I liked it. I gave this book to my friend Laura. a very Boston/Mass story.

Patchett likes to mix up her settings, yes? I still adore AP. She’s a top top tippity top favorite.

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I dedicate my reading of The Fifth Sense by NK Jemisin to MM, my mentor at my school last year. She and I went on to different adventures but are keeping in touch. She’s had about the same amount of changes as I have: new house/place to live plus new job. However, she got to say in the same state! I moved 1400 miles away. MM is awesome and I miss her. I’m actually taking a Spanish class at work (she’s a Spanish language teacher!) and so I get to think of her often…

This book is GOOD. I enjoyed it very much and am excited for the author and all the awards she is receiving for her talents. A series that I actually will/hope to read on.

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Rising Strong by Brené Brown is a self-help kind of book. Scoff and roll your eyes all you want but I like these upon occasion and do think they have value upon occasion. This one’s take away is to BE CURIOUS when you don’t like how you react to things that make you react in ways you don’t like. (You see what I did there, yep.) and it is good advice. When I cringe or shudder or get exasperated at things where that reaction isn’t the best one to take, WHY IS THAT? How can I react in a more positive manner.

It’s helping me be more aware but I haven’t yet figured much out…

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What Alice Forgot / Liane Moriarty

(I have forgotten Alice and I have forgotten what she forgot… I don’t even want to go check google. Let’s just say, I liked the Moriarity about the kindergarten kids and didn’t like the one about the Husband’s Secret. )

Carrying on…

End of Watch / Stephen King – It’s been a good summer for me and the Uncle Stevie. I finished the series. I liked the first one best. Just sayin’.

Slade House!  Recommended for next year

 

‘s October/RIP readings.

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I’ll try to post October readings  reviews in the next few weeks…

Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Poem Share and Happy World Dictionary Day

Thoughts

Poem:

Teach Your Children

by Crosby, Stills & Nash
You who are on the road
Must have a code that you can live by
And so become yourself
Because the past is just a good-bye.
Teach your children well,
Their father’s hell did slowly go by,
And feed them on your dreams
The one they picks, the one you’ll know by.
Don’t you ever ask them why, if they told you, you will cry,
So just look at them and sigh
And know they love you.
And you, of tender years,
Can’t know the fears that your elders grew by,
And so please help them with your youth,
They seek the truth before they can die.
Teach your parents well,
Their children’s hell will slowly go by,
And feed them on your dreams
The one they picks, the one you’ll know by.
Don’t you ever ask them why, if they told you, you will cry,
So just look at them and sigh and know they love you.
Songwriters: Graham Nash

 

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

August, You Were a Friend of Mine

August, You Were a Friend of Mine

Here’s my list from August:
The Grand Sophy / Georgette Heyer eB (1950,387) ***** 61
The Silent Wife / Kerry Fisher eB (2017,352) ** DNF 60
The Almost Sisters / Joshilyn Jackson ARC Tb (2017,339) **** 59
The Nightingale / Kristin Hannah Tb (2015,440) *** 58
Finders Keepers / Stephen King pb (2015,448) **** 57
Wake in Winter / Ndezhda Belenkaya eB (2016,368) ** DNF 56

Reviews, out of order…

I DNF’d Wake in Winter and The Silent Wife. I remember that Wake in Winter got off to a very clunky start with drastic change of tone and perspective of voice. Is the author talking or the character? Very abrupt. And… as always, when I get that distracting voice in my head that starts to question what is the what, I do looking for reviews. I found many critical negative reviews and it solidified my need to give it up. I can’t even remember what made me give up on The Silent Wife. Wow, nope, I don’t remember and don’t feel necessary to go find out. I’m sure I had good reasons. Feel free to click on the titles to go see the books in goodreads and do your own research.

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I’ve already mentioned elsewhere on the bookish social media outlets that I have an allergy to Kristin Hannah. I’m sure she is lovely and she is obviously held in high esteem by her fans and that is great. I just don’t like her style of writing. I do appreciate her giving attention to the amazing women who resisted the Nazis in WW2 and for that, The Nightingale gets three slices of pie. Bonus Apple Pie.

Another issue I had with The Nightingale was that the copy I purchased from Target had 40 pages missing!!! I kept reading and have decided I didn’t miss a thing. I was able to return the book for credit which I immediately used to buy another book.

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Stephen King’s Finders Keepers was that book. This is second in the Bill Hodges trilogy. I liked it. I tagged it as having a pie mention but will look it up another time.  (I read book #3 in September…)

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I very much enjoyed the humor and writing in The Almost Sisters. I think Joshilyn Jackson has talent. The story, at times, had a few things that made me cringe (like why do we think we have to rush the old people into a home! GEEEEESH) but otherwise, I thought the main character has some fun things going for her and she made me laugh. Maybe made me cry, too. I don’t remember that part but it might have had some heart tugs. Bonus pie mentions: ice pie, church pie, the making of pie crusts.

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And the BEST OF AUGUST! is Georgette Heyer’s The Grand Sophy. Fun stuff and always a vocabulary booster. If you like strong women in times that never expected strong women, these are a treat. Keep in mind, some character depictions will/may offend today’s sensibilities.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

This Blog is Ten Years Old

Wow.

I started this blog in September of 2007. Wow.

🎉👏🤓

I was reading only about 30 books a year, I had a Palm phone! – the first “smart” phone?, and I was so excited to be joining the book blogging community.

Anyway, just wanted to share this lil piece of news…

loveCare

 

July, July! What I’d Give to Be Back in July!

TropStorm Jose won’t leave. He was scheduled to rock Rhode Island on Tuesday but each day the winds seem more gusty and blowy and chilling. I walk the dogs through scattered leaves; I wrap in blankets; I’m sipping hot chocolate.

screech! Cancel that last one. I’m still enjoying beer but we’ve moved from the Shandies to Octoberfests. sigh….

Here’s the quick list of what I read in July:

The Sweet Hereafter / Russell Banks eB (1991,416) **** 55
Perfect / Rachel Joyce eB (2013,401) **** 54
NOS4A2 / Joe Hill eB (2013,704) *** 53
Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald / TAFowler Tb (2013,384) **** 52
On the Occasion of My Last Afternoon / Kaye Gibbons eB (1998,304) *** 51
Code Name Verity / Elizabeth Wein eB (2012,452) ***** 50

 

I loved Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein! There’s been some interesting chatter about its being classified as YA which I didn’t get. I always think of YA as being about younger characters and about youngster drama – even if extremely heavy AND also written with a feel like it was written for a younger reader than I am. (cough, cough). Now saying this “didn’t feel YA” is not meant to be any kind of lesser/more qualifier or criticism. I just never got that YA sense from it. Perhaps because it was set in WW2? I would say that The Book Thief – another one I love – IS YA but I wouldn’t say it about Code Name Verity. Yes, the two main characters were youthful but it didn’t feel like a story set up to be told to the YA typical audience.

Here’s more twist to this topic. I did think The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah most certainly had that YA feel. The Nightingale character and her experiences fit the YA criteria to a tee for YA for me. I liked Code Name MUCH MUCH more. I thought the writing quality was much higher but I do not think that has anything to do with any YA classification. Am I fooling myself?

I gave three stars to On the Occasion of My Last Afternoon because I really am not sure what to make of it. Bonus: pie! quote: “I was irritated that it might be the old lady who peddled stale pies.”

Moving on to books about wives of famous authors… I DNF’d The Paris Wife. Hadley drove me crazy. I loved Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald and when ever Hadley made an appearance — I still found her annoying.  Bonus: Chocolate Cream Pie!

My first read by author Joe Hill was The Fireman and I was eager to try something else. I actually had purchased NOS4A2 for my Kindle months before The Fireman-along was announced and I was eager to get to it because I so enjoyed the readalong. I liked NOS4A2 and it wasn’t quite as scary horrific as I thought it was going to be –  maybe I’m building up some kind of tolerance after so many King books…. (And it was Christmas in July! if you’ve read this, you’ll know what I mean.)    Bonus: Banana Pie!

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Perfect by Rachel Joyce. I really like Rachel Joyce. I had a tough time with Perfect. I ended up giving it 4 stars because of the skill of Rachel Joyce. She had me uncomfortably anxious, a low-level strumming sense of foreboding. This was a sad book. “You have to think bigger than what you know,”           Bonus: Mince pie!

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As I go through this list, I see many sad reads. The Sweet Hereafter was as sad as they come. Read it if you like sad books? if you like how competent some authors are with sad material? I don’t know. It was about a school bus full of children hitting an ice patch while proceeding down a hill and crashing into a pond off a steep embankment. Told from multiple character viewpoints. I’m getting weepy and sad thinking about it again. But Banks has my respect. It was well done. Four slices of pie.

Abbott says, “Biggest … difference … between … people … is … quality … of … attention.” And since a person’s quality of attention is one of the few things about her that a human can control, then she damn well better do it, say I. Put that together with the Golden Rule in a nutshell, and you’ve got my philosophy of life. Abbott’s too. And you don’t need religion for it.


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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

June Feels So Far Away

I read ten books in June and I don’t feel guilty at all that it is now September when I finally update y’all on that fact.

If you were at all curious, you would be checking my BOOKS READ page and seeing what is up. I do seem to keep that current. I also am quite up-to-date on goodreads. I also enjoy posting on Litsy, if you like that book + photo app. Oh, I haven’t gone away entirely. I’m on Twitter quite often. It’s just that blogging requires more technical accessibility than I usually have – I prefer to write posts on my laptop which requires WiFi and that is truly a pain in the ass to “make right”. WiFi access is spotty at best. I don’t even want to go into it.

Here’s my June list:

June 2017 (10)
The Atomic Weight of Love / Elizabeth Church eB (2016,320) **** 49
Lab Girl / Hope Jahren Tb (2016,290) ***** 48
Dark Matter / Blake Crouch eB (2016,342) **** 47
Case Histories / Kate Atkinson eB (2005,389) **** 46
Blindness / Jose Saramago Tb (1999,326) **** 45
Being God eB (2013,222) *** 44
Being Mortal HB (2014,282) **** 43
Godspeed eB *** (2012,406) 42
Everything I Never Told You A  (2014,10′) *** 41
Kitchens of the Great Midwest eB (2015,310) **** 40 apple pie

Lifted copy/paste from my Books Read page (see menu above), I realize I haven’t even yet provided the minimal info I usually do! Uh oh. I will, I suppose, probably, eventually, go back and fill that stuff in. But let’s just randomly chat about what this list provokes thought-wise in my head. Here goes.

I liked Atomic Weight of Love. It was… odd, in some ways, very mature and almost bitter in some ways. Not quite chick lit, weighty even, if you don’t mind. Feministish history, I might say. Read it if the synopsis appeals. I won’t tell more. Go to gr and decide for yourself. It did feel like a debut of a smart woman who has seen some things who wanted to write a book. I would read more by this author. I really don’t know if I’m right about that and should probably shut up.

Segue… AWoL featured an ambitious female scientist: see next book:

LAB GIRL!  I loved it, the geek in me loved it. Not quite what I expected but that is OK. I don’t mind surprises. It is one of those surprises that makes me curious of what I *DID* expect. A wonderment, really. Every time I see a tree chopped down, I think of this book.

Dark Matter is my kind of thriller! geeky for sure. Time travel awesome. I thought I read that a movie was in the works but I could find NO EVIDENCE of such on IMDB. #shrug

Case Histories for the WIN. I do think I have a crush on author Kate Atkinson. I think/hope this is a standalone but first in the series. I can get behind a series that is standalone with same characters so I just might (probably) seek out book #2 of the Brodie guy.

Blindness was disturbing. This is one of these oddly punctuated books (I think?) Did I not read that somewhere? I already gave away my copy and don’t recall what I did with it… Anyway, I NEVER, repeat RARELY notice punctuation oddities in a book if the story is gripping. I can only shudder… this is one helluva disturbing tale. I don’t think I want to see the movie.

Being God just wasn’t my kind of book. Pretty sure I skimmed/skipped my way through it. Middle school coming of age stuff.

Three months later I don’t even remember what Being Mortal was about. OH! Nonfiction about medicine and our not-great response to aging and attempting to prolong life far beyond when we should. By Atul Guwande. It was OK, not as great as I expected. Not sure why or what I expected but I didn’t find any advice in this like I had hoped.

And now I’m blanking on Godspeed. Something about clocks. Something about a kid being upset about a few missing seconds on a world clock reset? I might be thinking about an entirely different book. Due diligence should make me go clarify so someone isn’t steered astray… Yea, maybe later. Do your own research on this book!!!  [Correct, confusing with something else. This is a steampunk romance. Enjoyable but not memorable.]

I did not like Everything I Never Told You and I like the author. I follow and admire the author on Twitter. I did not or sadly could not find an emotional appreciation/connection to this book. I gave it three stars because of pie mentions.

Kitchens of the Great Midwest was terrific! I really enjoyed it. I was saddened to followup with reviews to find many friends did NOT like this or read a review that convinced them they would not like it so are crossing off lists! I REALLY liked this book and found much that appealed to my reading emotional self. It’s all just crazy. That’s OK. Too each their own. But I would LOVE to make J____ read this and change her mind and then sit and discuss over wine….  (Wow – I don’t usually try twist peoples arms to read a book but it somehow keeps poppin up in my recall that she is thinking this won’t appeal to her…  I think that what one reviewer found annoying, I found tongue-in-cheek amusing, so it made me chuckle where the other person reacted with DNF and/or chucking the book across the room. Funny, huh.

Maybe I will post soon about the 6 books I read in July and/or the 6 books I read in August!

Here’s the photo of the sky on one of our recent boat rides:

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Latest and Greatest

Recent Thoughts and Other Things…

I’ve read 4 books since my last review post and finished up May strong with 8 books (one of which was a skim from half point…)

Total for the year so far:  39 books, 9672 pages, ~147 hours

I decided a quick audiobook (< 3 hours) was just the thing to catapult my month’s stats to something I can be proud of and chose Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things to Me It was both unexpected and affirming; she is an eloquent voice for feminism and human rights. I very much enjoyed this. I was also pleased that she lent insight to Virginia Woolf’s Orlando

I DNF’d Orlando Sob, shame, embarrassment. It is NOT a summer beach read; it is dense and though very lively, it takes concentration. I admit I was lost and believe this would be a great book for serious study just not right now in the moment of my crazy life. I had originally attempted the audiobook – nope. Reading the ebook was easier, but… I can’t quite describe the feeling of drowning it gave me. Submerged in what I can only assume is amazing prose but HUH? I need guidance for next time. And I do want to try again. It’s not dry and dusty; it is very lively, but hold on! Goodness.

My neighbor gave me a book written by a friend of hers from a writing group she was involved with. I must say that it was well-written and informative, fascinating even.  I know many will and should enjoy it. It just wasn’t my cup of tea in style and format; I guess genre. I like the heavier serious immersive stuff. (How I can say that I liked The Sport of Kings when I didn’t like it but I can “like” this but not? Does that make any sense whatsoever? Nah, I didn’t think so.) I can find much to admire and can recommend Holly Warah’s debut Where Jasmine Blooms I give it 3 slices of pie. (It did have lots of pie so I could bump up to a 4 slice?)  I now must get my hands on a recipe for SAMBUSIK PIE.

Finally, my MIL gave me  A Long Way Home by Saroo Brierly and I read it in one day. What an amazing story! If you have seen or  know about the movie Lion, you know what this is:  young boy finds himself on a train to Calcutta, many MANY miles away from home. He is adopted by a family in Australia and when he is 30, he decides to find out about his birth-family. WOW!!

I’m listening to Everything I Never Told You and honestly, I’m not feeling it. Shrug. I’m about 35% in. Maybe I’m just in a horrible mood this summer!? No, that can’t be all of it — I have Kitchens of the Great Midwest on ebook and I am finding it delightful.

Finally. School is out and we are headed to the boat and the lovely waters of Rhode Island. You may not see me around here much… Wishing everyone a super summer and lots of great reading!

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The Sport of Kings

Thoughts  by C.E. Morgan, Macmillan Audio, ~23 hours

Narrated by George Newbern.

(After listening for about 10% progress and realizing that I had accidentally skipped a few chapters, I stopped into my local indie bookstore and asked to see a copy of the print version so I could look up how to spell a character’s name (and check if I really did skip a few chapters!) I ended up buying it: Picador 2016, 545 pages.)

Challenge: Tournament of Books 2017 (yes, I am late; last one)
Genre: Epic Family Drama, Literary Fiction°
Type/Source: Audiobook / Audible (later Tradeback/Indie bookstore)
 Why I read listened this now: Ready for a sprawling drama delivered over many hours.

MOTIVATION for READING: After skipping this during TOB, I realized during the discussion that it might be just my kind of book. I have a fondness for long audiobooks and now that it is lawn mowing season, I have more time and chores to listen through. Also, I admit that finding out that C.E. Morgan is a woman piques my interest.

WHAT’s it ABOUT:  This book is about a family who claimed property in Kentucky by way of Virginia and established their dynasty. Family name and heritage was everything. Until the father and son dispute just how to carry on.

Father says “Stay the course. Grow corn. Drink bourbon.” Son says, “Kentucky means Thoroughbreds. We need to breed horses.”

Father dies, son carries on as he sees fit and the family dynasty only grows in wealth and prestige. To be great, is the goal.

And then a daughter is born and she has her own ideas. We meet a few other characters, of course – this is a beast of a book.

WHAT’s GOOD: Drama!

What’s NOT so good: Near the end of the book, when the intensity was getting too intense, I tweeted for help. I was scared to read further, to find out what the characters were going to do.

I steeled myself and continued. It was as bad as I feared.

Then the Epilogue really screwed with my head, but after reading it again and listening to those 10+ minutes, I’m ok now. All O.K.

Reeling, but I’m a gonna be fine.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Racism, classism, plant and animal classification systems, genealogy, the color green, the word ‘karst’.

I had to know how it ended. I was bothered, at times, with tedious use of words-a-plenty and the over descriptions and the heavy import weightiness of many paragraphs. But the action and the drama were on a high level so I kept at it.

RATING: Four slices of Derby Pie.

“There was some poison in the pie; she wanted the treacly sweet of determinism with its aftertaste of martyrdom, but that came at too high a cost.”

“Hush, my sweet little horseypie,”

 

 

pierating

 °  “The main reason for a person to read Genre Fiction is for entertainment, for a riveting story, an escape from reality. Literary Fiction separates itself from Genre because it is not about escaping from reality, instead, it provides a means to better understand the world and delivers real emotional responses.”

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