Speculating on the Tournament of Books 2017 #TOB17

Hello Friends!

Michelle wants me to post my brackets. Oh Bracketing-schmacketing! Oh, how dost this exercise tax me…

Here goes. This first bracket is my WISH of FAVORITES. I did not think at all about possibilities of winning; only went with my heart. Do know that the Zombies are impossible to predict! I can’t fathom how to do that part. I hope you can read this? Is it too small? I can always save them to a GoogleDocLink.

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I want My Name is Lucy Barton to win it all. Do I think it will win, could win?! No.

I just attempted to include a list of all the books in the order that I ‘liked” and I couldn’t even accomplish THAT! Some I rank higher now than I did when I star-rated them and I bet my feelings/rankings would change tomorrow – I’m so fickle. And the issue that I still need to finish High Dive, The Sport of Kings, and The Nix. I *think* I will really like The Nix; I am liking High Dive but find myself NOT picking it up and doing anything else which is wrecking my mojo. The Sport of Kings is one I am dreading because of page count (560 but comparing this to The Nix’s 628 collapses my reasoning.) See? I cannot defend my bracket!

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For my shaky tentative guess as to what may happen:

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I don’t really have any faith that The Underground Railroad is a lock here but, something has to win… I haven’t read The Nix yet (as I have already mentioned for the gazillionth time), but I would be pleased if it could go on to claim the Rooster. I wouldn’t really be upset if any of these books won the Rooster. Surprised perhaps, but not unhappy. (After writing and editing this post, I already want to change my mind on a few spots… sigh)

I look forward to the lively commentary and reviews! Always a good time. Watch for it on March 8th.

To create your own pretty bracket speculation chart, click –> here <– and follow the links.

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Moonglow

Thoughts mgbymc by Michael Chabon, HarperAudio 2016, 14 hours 46 minutes

Narrated by George Newbern.

Challenge: TOB shortlist
Genre: fiction-memoir, speculative-memoir?
Type/Source: Audio/Audible Credit
 Why I read this now: Finished The Bone Clocks; this was up next.

MOTIVATION for READING: One thing that recommends this besides it being TOB is that it is written by Chabon. I have only read The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and want to read more.

WHAT’s it ABOUT: I’m deferring to a few bits of the goodreads blurb because it is excellent. To read the whole blurb, click on the cover above because even though it is the button for the audio and I probably should link to Audible.com, I believe you would prefer access to the goodreads reviews rather than Audible. Am I wrong? Feel free to comment.

 …  the latest feat of legerdemain in the ongoing magic act that is the art of Michael Chabon.

Moonglow unfolds as the deathbed confession, made to his grandson, of a man the narrator refers to only as “my grandfather.” It is a tale of madness, of war and adventure, of sex and desire and ordinary love, of existential doubt and model rocketry, of the shining aspirations and demonic underpinnings of American technological accomplishment at mid-century and, above all, of the destructive impact—and the creative power—of the keeping of secrets and the telling of lies. A gripping, poignant, tragicomic, scrupulously researched and wholly imaginary transcript of a life that spanned the dark heart of the twentieth century, Moonglow is also a tour de force of speculative history. (edited/cut) Chabon devises and reveals, in bits and pieces whose hallucinatory intensity is matched only by their comic vigor and the radiant moonglow of his prose, a secret history of his own imagination.

WHAT’s GOOD:  The unraveling, layering, building. The metaphors, the descriptors, the confident prose. I am almost certain that if you had me read a few pages of a book without identifying the author, I could pick out Chabon’s style and phrasing.

What’s NOT so good:  See above. Unfortunately, I feel like I can dip into and skip around and know that even as am surely ‘missing something’, I won’t miss it.

FINAL THOUGHTS:  If I wasn’t in such a gosh darn hurry to get these books crossed off the list, I would listen to every word and marvel. I would be entertained, enthralled, captivated, etc. I think I’ll just put another or all of Chabon’s books on my tbr and hope to read them someday.

SPECIFIC to TOB:  Due to the narrative structure and question of memoir vs fiction, I really wish this book was slated to compete against Black Wave. What a discussion that could be!  What a syllabus for a college class: these two books, add in A Million Little Pieces by James Frey, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas by Gertrude Stein and everything by Mary Karr. But what do I know? I haven’t read any of those…

RATING: Four slices of pie. And I did hear a mention (as in, a list of desserts brought to a party) but I failed to capture the specifics.

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Moonglow collapses an era into a single life and a lifetime into a single week. A lie that tells the truth, a work of fictional non-fiction, an autobiography wrapped in a novel disguised as a memoir, Moonglow is Chabon at his most daring, his most moving, his most Chabonesque.

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The Bone Clocks Readalong Wrap up

Thoughts  tbcbydm by David Mitchell, Random House 2014, 624 pages

Narrated by Jessica Ball, Leon Williams, Colin Mace, Steven Crossley, Laurel Lefkow, Anna Bentinck; Recorded Books 2014, 24 hours 30 minutes

Challenge: boneclocksbtn
Genre: SciFi
Type/Source: Hardback AND Audio / Library and Audible
 Why I read this now: Melissa and I co-hosted the Readalong! (which I probably wouldn’t have agreed to if I had remembered that January and February are hot times to read the TOB books… But it worked out. Melissa did the heavy lifting. I basically just cheered along.)

MOTIVATION for READING: David Mitchell’s books are best read with friends, in my opinion but I have never tried one alone so I have no idea.

WHAT’s it ABOUT:  I’m not going to tell what this is about because Melissa explains it so well at her wrap up post here. Go read that – and do know that it is full of spoilers assuming you’ve read the whole book!

I’m going to offer random thoughts for here on out…

  • I do have to agree with Melissa about Soleil – where did she come from and where did she go?!
  • I thought Hugo Lamb was a great lovable bad guy. And how sweet was he that he was still in love with Holly?!  aw… swoon.
  • Holly was great. However (in only one section) – the voice? I’m not sure which narrators narrated what, but in the Crispin section — the male attempting Holly’s voice was WRONG. Very distracting.
  • The above point was the only issue I had with the narration. Otherwise, I thought all the voices SPOT ON. I enjoyed the audiobook very much. I did also read (went back and forth) to the hardcover from the library.
  • I was impatient to find out about Jacko and was sad that XiLo-Jacko didn’t make it back. Nor Esther.
  • So the different kinds of Horologists…   Funny, huh? The 49-day reincarnators and the body-hoppers?  If they had a term, I missed it.
  • I did kind of like Crispin – that section was too long! But it made me appreciate David Mitchell’s character development skills. And I liked how that section included a Writer’s-How-To manual.
  • Did you catch that part when Mitchell made fun of himself; “Never trust a guy with two first names.”?  Ha.
  • Melissa and I disagree some on the last section. She sensed that she was being preached at concerning environmental issues but I was only fascinated by the  possible scenarios. The Chinese being the world’s caretakers? Young ladies hoping to marry so they could get such luxuries as regular meals and Wifi. And what about Iceland? I have always wanted to go to Iceland.
  • So. Crispin and Holly. Friends. Friends who both wondered “what if?” Both denied acting on a possible ‘extension’ to their friendship to other realms. One, because Crispin KNEW he didn’t deserve Holly; but Holly? She sensed his sensitivity, his intelligence, his success. She recognized his ego in decline? His vulnerability? Did she sense that he was so different from Ed? (Cuz, YEA.) That she was a one-guy-gal? It felt so TRUE to me! That they became friends and wanted more but both doubted it would work, that it would be complicated, ruin a nice friendship, or what? just true. I really was startled when Marinus stated that both wanted love together but failed to even recognize it within themselves! How much do we miss of ourselves and how do we capture/recognize/trust these obvious or not truths about ourselves? I wonder…
  • Ed. Let’s talk about Ed but let’s consider some movies that explore the same stuff that Ed was experiencing. I’m thinking Whiskey Tango Foxtrot starring Tina Fey. I watched this movie today; it was my second viewing and it was just as good. It is not a highly rated movie but it hits a lot of buttons I like in movies. Shrug. The part of about how Ed feels more alive when he is chasing a story in life-threatening situations… I dunno. It stopped me. Had to think about that. I felt for him AND Holly. Poor Holly. Holly was so cool.
  • And here we are, considering fictional characters as real people.
  • I had been waiting for the labyrinth. It was cool that she had a pendant created so she was able to study it. Probably not a hidden hint that the map was going to be important but I was impatient for it and an explanation for whatever happened to Jacko. All those little insertions of story points that we know are bound to be important – like Aunti Eilísh chatting with the not-quite-Jacko and telling Ed about it.

I’m honored you’re telling me all this, Eilísh, honestly – but why are you telling me all this?
I’m being told to.
Who . . . who by?
By the Script.
What script?

  • Who wrote the Script??!??!?!?!  It did come up again, didn’t it? or is my memory faulty already?
  • I always rate good books higher when I’ve enjoyed a terrific readalong experience. This is no different. And I’m also going to rate this higher because of the many excellent pie references. MANY. LOTS. STRATEGIC. PLOT-PIVOTAL. Entertaining PIE REFERENCES. This David Mitchell guy might be studying Stephen King (#ifyouknowhatImean #butofcourseyoudon’tsoletmetellyou. King always has great pie quotes in his books.) I’ll just share ’em. Some are unpleasant but still awesome. Here they are!  The last one is AMAZING!
  • But wait — before I start the pie quotes, I want to disavow any hint I might have dropped that this isn’t a great book unless it has pie and was read as a readalong. I rate books by my reaction to them and so this is my rating. I do think it a really good book.
  • Who’s up for SLADE HOUSE? (Who has read this far?)

The PIE

page 13 2.08% “I’ll make scones and plum pies and coffee cakes and Vinny’ll be all, “Jesus, Holly, how did I ever get by without you?”
page 17 2.72% “Mam’ll make me steaming shit pie, dripping in shit gravy, and sit there smug as hell watching me eat every shitty morsel, and from now until the end of time, if ever I’m anything less than yes – sir – no – sir – three – bags – full – sir, she’ll bring up the Vinny Costello Incident.”
page 40 6.41%American Pie” song
page 68 10.9% “Somewhere in the July 2 bit of the A Hot Spell chapter is a reference to a “pie in the sky“. Too busy walking two dogs listening to audiobook to clip/note.
page 149 23.88% “Chetwynd-Pitt, Quinn and Fitzimmons have eaten – – Günter’s daube, a beef stew, and a wedge of apple pie with cinnamon sauce – and have started on the cocktails which, thanks to my lost bet, I have the honor of buying for Chetwynd-Pitt.”
page 446 71.4% “Do you remember, Doctor, we grew rhubarb at Dawkins Hospital? I remember the pies,” I tell him.
page 540 86.5% “Holly drops the thing. ‘Rolling pin’. Where did you find a rolling pin in here? ‘I nicked it from your kitchen at 119A.’
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RATING: Five slices of pie.

 

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Save Me

Thoughts smbykkl by Kristin Kusek Lewis, Grand Central Publishing 2014, 288 pages

Challenge: Book Club Book
Genre: Chick Lit
Type/Source: eBook / Amazon Kindle
 Why I read this now: Club is today! Book finished TODAY at 5:54 am.

MOTIVATION for READING: I love book clubs. I love that I may be introduced to books I would otherwise never read, books that are outside my typical genre, hopefully something new and original and fresh. Unfortunately, this book wasn’t those things for me. It wasn’t horrible, but I was constantly nitpicky and wishing I was reading anything else. Does that make me a book snob? I feel like I’m being very book-snobby today. And of course, I know the fear of recommending a book to club that isn’t liked so this review is not meant to chide or reflect on the person who chose it because she is a lovely person and I hope she enjoyed the book – my opinion is just an opinion. I hope we have a fun discussion…

WHAT’s it ABOUT: Daphne is a doctor married to a doctor. They met in summer camp as kids but were re-acquainted by a chance encounter when they both discover they will be doing their residency at the SAME HOSPITAL!  It’s fate, it’s storybook. They get married, buy their dream home and get ready for that time when they can start a family. However, Owen discovers that he is just not ready to be a father and strays then admits to a brief affair. Daphne is shattered, “This just so isn’t like Owen, he’s a good guy.” Does Daphne forgive him? Does Daphne listen to her best friend and sister who vehemently tell her that Owen is NO GOOD?

I had understood that the book was about how it gets complicated when the chickie Owen flings with has a devastating car crash requiring long term care; Daphne selflessly decides to help caretake! Explore THAT. Yea, but no — that didn’t quite happen. The girl dies (oops – spoiler alert!) and now Owen crawls back to Daph with the newly realized awoken love for his wife. Daphne meanwhile has met a hottie distraction of her own, waffles back and forth of what to do until she eventually decides that Owen is correct: their marriage isn’t worth saving anyway. Bye bye.

WHAT’s GOOD: I found no misspelled words and not that many things worthy of an eye roll. I thought I had found one thing but it was cleared up later to my satisfaction. (Ok, it bugged me when she kept mentioning reading a book (The Woman in White) for “Annie’s book club” and I thought it odd that it wasn’t “MY book club” or just “book club”. But she actually explains it later. Well huh.)

What’s NOT so good: Full of those head game questions,”What do I do? I am so confused; do I love him? Should I take him back? What does it say about him that he decides to send this (lovey dovey email) when the woman whom he cheated with is lying in a hospital bed? How can he be so callous?

I don’t know! “Do I like this book? What’s wrong with it? Am I bored? Do I care if Daphne stays with Owen?”

FINAL THOUGHTS: It was tedious and I finally decided that what I love about books are surprises and delights. This book had neither.

RATING: Two slice of pie. Honestly, I was pleased that I found 2-3 pie mentions. There’s a bit about how her mother often entered cooking contests making mini pot pies and then Daphne cooks up her mother-in-law’s recipe for Chicken Pot Pie.

 

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Black Wave

Thoughts bwbymt by Michelle Tea, Feminist Press 2016, 326 pages

Challenge: Tournament of Books
Genre: LGBTQ
Type/Source: Tradeback (with lovely deckle edge) / purchased directly from publisher.
 Why I read this now: Book arrived just in time.

MOTIVATION for READING: By the way, the Tournament Brackets have been announced. The fun starts March 8 with this book versus The Underground Railroad. I’m cheering for Black Wave. Actually, the March 8 date will likely be the Pre-Tournament Play-in Match and I’m going to predict Sudden Death.

WHAT’s it ABOUT: This is a cleverly told tale of a writer attempting her second book and experiencing ‘life’ so she will have things to write about. Let’s just say her life experiences are dramatic and risky. There’s also that environment/weather gone haywire issue.

“The planet’s dead,” Kym said cheerfully.

WHAT’s GOOD: I loved her tone, her wording, the style. I loved her nonchalance, her waywardness, her passions. No matter what her lifestyle decisions, she nailed that universal mid-to-late 20s ‘now what?!‘ malaise. There is humor and there is end of the world tragedy. What’s not to love? She also gets to meet Matt Dillon!

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What’s NOT so good: I thought this book just kept getting better and better. There are definitely some fiction-nonfiction (anti-memoir? “autofiction”?) curveballs to the narrative but just roll with it.

FINAL THOUGHTS: My goodreads review is this:

A love story. A tender whacked-out apocalyptic love story.

 

Other REVIEWs:  Teresa at Shelf Love writes a fabulous review that tells you much more than I do.

RATING: Five slices of pie. Pie with ice cream, Strawberry Rhubarb Pie and Shepherd’s Pie!

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Bookish Poems for Our Times

I have a friend and coworker who is a member of a book club whose leader writes poems for each year. She shared a few of these poems with me and I asked for permission to post. The poet’s name is Indu Gargeya. The first one was from 2016 and the second is her latest, at the start of the new year. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

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My dear fellow literary-enthusiasts,
Over the last few years, I have absolutely cherished,
Every Book Club meeting, where opinions have flourished.
Many a theme we have followed through it all,
And learned so much about matters big and small.
Let’s indulge in the various genres of literature this time,
From the classics to short stories, few authors in their prime.
“Realistic fiction” will herald  the beginning of it all,
As we explore the minds of two brothers, so sure to enthrall.
Our “Thriller” in question has so many people raving,
High praise and several  awards, Hollywood came calling.
An epic of an extraordinary life fulfills our “Biography”,
The vivid, descriptive detail so beautiful, it’s iconography.
Our “Classic” is a highly acclaimed work of American literature,
Required reading by so many schools, it’s almost a scripture.
The “Historical novel” category won the Man Booker Prize,
It is so eloquently written, it’s surely no surprise.
Choosing to read our “Nonfiction” book would be our good fortune,
The author so inspirational, not to do so our misfortune.
A journalist ‘s harrowing experiences make for a dramatic “Memoir”,
Her survival tactics and skills such an amazing repertoire.
The Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to our “Short stories”,
A distinguished Canadian author, the world celebrates her glories.
Our last read is a “Love story” with subtle hints of “Science fiction”,
Matters such as relationships and existentialism written with deep conviction.
So, let’s hope our reflections further our intellectual leaning,
As we contemplate our life and times and the ultimate meaning.
My fond hope remains that we “always look on the bright side of life”,
And smell the roses and hear a melodious bird sing as if playing a fife.

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Dear Friends,
As the year drew to a melancholic end,
Frayed emotions were too stirred to mend.
Watching or reading about the Tweeter-in-Chief,
Caused Hillary supporters to be immersed in grief.
We were deprived of so much joy and pride,
Nonchalantly told to take it all in stride.
Inspiring literary characters will lessen our stress,
Hopefully save us from reading “140 characters or less.”
Realization has dawned on my fifty-five year old self,
That I am more of a feminist than I credited myself.
So, I deliberately chose books by women authors,
To celebrate grandmothers, mothers, sisters and daughters.
Michelle’s rousing appeal, “When they go low, we go high,”
Will help us have a positive attitude and we surely will try.
My fond hope remains that we “always look on the bright side of life”,
And smell the roses and hear a melodious bird sing as if playing a fife.
– Indu Gargeya

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I thank Anu for sharing and I thank her poet friend Indu Gargeya for allowing me to publish this for all my book blogging friends.

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The Underground Railroad

Thoughts tugrrbycw by Colson Whitehead, Doubleday Books 2016, 306 pages

Challenge: TOB Short List
Genre: Adult Fiction, Imaginative History?
Type/Source: Hardcover / Contest Win
 Why I read this now: Book arrived just as I finished Sudden Death

WHAT’s it ABOUT: Cora is a slave in Georgia and Caesar invites her to escape with him. They manage to hitch a ride on the Underground Railroad which is actually a real locomotive underground tunneling train ride rather than a metaphor. They spend quality time learning to read and working real jobs in South Carolina when they have an opportunity to catch the next rail out. Cora makes it to North Carolina but it’s not a happy spot, at all. If this part was truly based on real events, I had no idea. Chilling. There’s more adventure to follow for Cora but none of it is good.

WHAT’s GOOD: Imaginative. Chilling. 

What’s NOT so good: I didn’t connect to the characters. I kept comparing it to Homegoing, unfortunately. I don’t think this book had anything startling new to share on the topic of slavery. As Penny on Big Bang Theory said, “Slavery is bad.”

FINAL THOUGHTS: I could blame the circumstance of reading a review of someone on goodreads who REALLY didn’t like this book and I have often found her reviews insightful and interesting, especially on the merits of literature. I think I ended up looking for those details and negativities but I really do want to say that reading the book was a meaningful experience for me and I’m sure the many wonderful reviews are valid. Please read this for yourself and let’s have some fascinating discussion during the March Tournament, ok? And remind me NOT to read reviews while I’m in the middle of a book!!!

RATING: Remember, three stars says I LIKED IT. I wasn’t blown away by it, I preferred other TOB books of late. But I’m glad to have read it.

I thank Jeanne of Necromancy Doesn’t Pay for sending me this book. She shares that this book is “powerfully written and deeply disturbing.” Please read Jeanne’s review here. 

 

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Letter Month 2017

It’s February and that means it is Letter Month.

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I will be participating. I will answer every letter I receive (and all I received in January – if I haven’t already.)

I have been unable to access my account or create a new one on the lettermo.com website so any attempts to connect with me there will be to no avail.

May you have a blessed February.

loveCare

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Sudden Death

Thoughts sdbyae by Álvaro Enrigue, Riverhead 2016, 264 pages

Translated from Spanish to English by Natasha Wimmer.

Audiobook published by Tantor Audio, narration by Robert Fass, 6 hours 57 minutes.

Challenge: TOB Short List
Genre: Historical Fiction / Tennis Lit
Type/Source: Hardback AND Audio / Library
 Why I read this now: Selected due to shortness of the audiobook, in hopes that I could finish in January to be my 12th book of the month.

MOTIVATION for READING: TOB…

WHAT’s it ABOUT: I’m going to copy and paste one of the goodreads blurbs.

A funny and mind-bending novel about the clash of empires and ideas in the sixteenth century, told over the course of one dazzling tennis match

A brutal tennis match in Rome.

Two formidable opponents: the wild Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio and the loutish Spanish poet Francisco de Quevedo.

Galileo, Saint Matthew and Mary Magdalene heckle from the sidelines.

In England, Thomas Cromwell and Henry VIII execute Anne Boleyn, and her executioner transforms her legendary locks into the most sought-after tennis balls of the time.

Across the ocean in Mexico, the last Aztec emperors play their own games, as Hernán Cortés and his Mayan translator and lover scheme and conquer, fight and fuck, not knowing that their domestic comedy will change the course of history.

Over the course of one dazzling tennis match – through assassinations and executions, carnal liaisons and papal dramas, artistic and religious revolutions, love and war – Sudden Death tells the grand adventure of the clash of empires and the dawn of the modern era.

WHAT’s GOOD: It really is fascinating. And has its funny moments.

What’s NOT so good: It’s also too difficult to keep track of in my current end-of-month scramble to finish a book (impatience) and the wrestling with reading books I feel “I have to” and not what “I want to” — which I realize is messed-up thinking so let’s throw in the current state of the world affairs, my own crazy messy life stuff, and realizing I have a book club book to read by next week.

Allow me to share a few thoughts from my reader friends:

sdbyaegr

FINAL THOUGHTS: I’m skimming the rest of this and do not think I will be missing anything (actually, as I miss EVERYTHING!) – in other words, I will be able to follow the upcoming TOB commentary and likely agree with everyone. If you are reading this, let me know if it has any pie.

RATING: Three slices of pie! I liked it, I’m just needing to move on. It does deserve more time and fuller attention than I care to give it at this time. I have my regrets and may I only mutter, someday…

Highly recommended for fans of lively history and TENNIS.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Version Control

Thoughts vcbydp by Dexter Palmer, Vintage 2016, 512 pages

Challenge: TOB Short List
Genre: Science Fiction
Type/Source: Tradeback / Local Indie Bookstore
 Why I read this now:  Book trade with Katie!

MOTIVATION for READING: I tbr’d this book back in November and I’m not sure if that is when the TOB Long List was published? but I know I had interest in this book before the short list was announced. I’m just getting to it now.

WHAT’s it ABOUT: Rebecca is a young wife, recovering from a tragedy a few years back and is married to a physicist working on a causality violation device (do NOT call it a time machine!) She suspects that something is ‘off’, things just aren’t quite right, normal feels vaguely odd. Gee, whatever could it be?

WHAT’s GOOD: This is a meaty story with lots of interesting characters and details and tension. A bit of foreshadowing and a few teasers are dropped in and the slow build really keeps the interest going.

The drop in conversations with The President were very creepy. The autonomous automobiles were cool.

What’s NOT so good: Though I loved the sly political commentary on person rights versus data collection and the analysis of how computer dating systems are designed to be financially viable, I was not so comfortable or convinced on a few plot points.

FINAL THOUGHTS: In the beginning, I had that eager anticipation that this book was going to be SOMETHING, a book of heft and weight and delight in its unfolding. And not that it wasn’t, but it arc’d. Though it ended satisfactorily, it wasn’t the five slicer I had initially thought it could be.

RATING: A solid four slice of pie thriller.

 

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.