We Love You, Charlie Freeman

Thoughts wlycfbykg by Kaitlyn Greenidge, Algonquin Books Kindle Ed. 2016, 337 pages

Challenge: Rooster TOB Shortlist
Genre: Adult Fiction or Young Adult Fiction…
Type/Source: eBook / Kindle
 Why I read this now: It was offered as a daily deal for $1.99

MOTIVATION for READING: Reading all the TOB Shortlist

WHAT’s it ABOUT:  I refer you to the goodreads blurb:

The Freeman family–Charles, Laurel, and their daughters, teenage Charlotte and nine-year-old Callie–have been invited to the Toneybee Institute in rural Massachusetts to participate in a research experiment. They will live in an apartment on campus with Charlie, a young chimp abandoned by his mother. The Freemans were selected for the experiment because they know sign language; they are supposed to teach it to Charlie and welcome him as a member of their family.

Isolated in their new, nearly all-white community not just by their race but by their strange living situation, the Freemans come undone. And when Charlotte discovers the truth about the Institute’s history of questionable studies, the secrets of the past begin to invade the present.

The power of this novel resides in Kaitlyn Greenidge’s undeniable storytelling talents. What appears to be a story of mothers and daughters, of sisterhood put to the test, of adolescent love and grown-up misconduct, and of history’s long reach, becomes a provocative and compelling exploration of America’s failure to find a language to talk about race.

WHAT’s GOOD:  Surprising, enterprising*, engaging. I am glad to have read it and I don’t know if going totally blind into this was the best idea. But I think it was.

What’s NOT so good: Messy, unwieldy, faltering. (I have a few questions…)

FINAL THOUGHTS: I actually liked this more than I can express and it is the opposite of my feelings for Sweet Lamb of Heaven. In this book I liked it more but found a few faults. With Sweet Lamb, I didn’t like it all that much but couldn’t figure out why. Go figure.

RATING: Three slices of pie. MUD pie!

In his first few days at Courtland County he’d asked, “Y’all do what around here? Fish in ponds? Make mud pies?” and one of them gulped, “We go to the laser show at the CCC’s astronomy lab.” And he’d laughed.

 

∗ enterprise – a project that involves many people and that is often complicated or difficult.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl

Thoughts 13wolaafgbyma by Mona Awad, Penguin 2016, 212 pages

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Challenge: What’s in a Name Challenge: Number # in Title
Genre: Adult Lit / Linked Short Stories
Type/Source: Tradeback / Library
 Why I read this now: Longlisted but not shortlisted for the TOB

MOTIVATION for READING: This was one of two books on the TOB Long List that would satisfy any categories in other reading challenges I am participating in this year. And it was available at the library. The Nix is the other – hopefully getting to that soon. 

WHAT’s it ABOUT: Our protog is the only child of a fat mom and a dad that split. She survives high school, somehow graduates college after trying every degree option available, cultivates interests that easily spark online conversations, meets men online, arranges to meet one of them and THROW THE ROSE PETALS! they fall in love. She has such a low self esteem that she somehow manages to lose weight to fit the ideal of what she thinks her new man –> fiancé –> husband deserves (not sure if deserves is the right word here) but now she no longer has any shared interests with her man; they have nothing in common anymore and eventually they split up.

It’s all about situations and relationships skewed by her physicalness and what she thinks it is, what it means. Maybe?

WHAT’s GOOD: It’s so sad.

What’s NOT so good: The self-loathing is so very sad.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Not my cup of tea. The writing was fine.

RATING: Three slices of pie.

I meant to count how many stories were in this book to see if there were thirteen. That would makes sense, right? But I returned it to the library before I remembered. So I got to thinking, what IS this preoccupation with “13 Ways to Look” at stuff? Quite a few books with this title beginning. And THEN! I recalled there is a poem, a famous poem (doh!) which I just now took the opportunity to go read: Wallace Stevens’ Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird. I didn’t get that, either.

Now I can’t get the Beatles Blackbird song out of my head. “Blackbird singing in the dead of night…” At least it is a pretty song. I think I’ll go look up the lyrics and count that for my Poetry 100 Challenge, too.

But before I chase off to go do that! A thought interrupts my task with this:

Sing a song of sixpence – AKA blackbirds in a pie
Sing a song of sixpence a pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened the birds began to sing,
Oh wasn’t that a dainty dish to set before the king?
The king was in his counting house counting out his money
The queen was in the parlour eating bread and honey
The maid was in the garden hanging out the clothes,
When down came a blackbird and pecked off her nose!

PIE!  (But I prefer the Beatles song, don’t you?!)

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Sweet Lamb of Heaven

Thoughts slohbylmby Lydia Millet, WWNorton&Co 2016, 250 pages

Challenge: Rooster 2017
Genre: Adult Lit
Type/Source: Hardcover / Library
 Why I read this now: Came off hold before the others…

MOTIVATION for READING: The Tournament of Books by the Morning News – I have a shot at reading ALL the books on the short list. This is the 7th.

WHAT’s it ABOUT: In one sense, this is a story of a woman with a young daughter who realizes her marriage is a sham and flees her husband. But there is so much more that boggles the brain that I can’t even begin to describe it all. The fact that all of this is shared in less than 300 pages is amazing. It is about language and communication. It is dystopic and end-of-the-world fears. It is about us versus them. It’s quite freaky actually, but also extremely composed. Not tense, really, just shaky and slightly off-key. Everything is not quite right but not unbelievable even when reality REALLY gets distorted. It’s all a dream, right? Just a bad dream.

Having this book as your only read on a deserted island would NOT be recommended.

WHAT’s GOOD: The ability of the author to successfully make you doubt everything along with the narrator and yet also be separate.

What’s NOT so good: I can’t put my finger on why I didn’t ‘enjoy’ this more. It is that vague unsettling that makes it good. But.

FINAL THOUGHTS: I think I’m just perplexed and left disillusioned. I am glad it’s over. It reminds me of a book somewhere that discussed the basics of the word ‘disease’: dis- the opposite of or absence of, -ease freedom from pain or trouble of the body or mind.  I am willing to read something else by Ms Millet. Any suggestions?

If you love the concepts and mysteries of language, you might want to consider this. If you are at all enraged by politics at the moment, you might want to skip this.

RATING: Three slices of pie.

LOTS of pie mentioned:  pumpkin, fake mincemeat, and pecan; cherry pie, berry pie, honey pie and chicken pot pie. Pie dough, too.

PS There is a fascinating 5 star review on goodreads by “Jill” (I only follow her) who described the story as “like a Rubik’s cube.” If you are interested in her thoughts, I suggest you go find her post.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Just Mercy

Thoughts jmbybs by Bryan Stevenson, Spiegel & Grau 2014, 349 pages

Genre:  Nonfiction, Death Penalty Debate
Type/Source: Tradeback / Local Indie Bookstore
 Why I read this now: Mr. Stevenson is speaking next month as part of a prominent lecture series in town. The Local Indie Bookstore is having book club discussions and offered a discount on the book.

MOTIVATION for READING: I am interested in the work Mr. Stevenson does through the Equal Justice Initiative in Alabama.

WHAT’s it ABOUT: The EJI provides legal support for inmates sentenced to die for their crimes – most in the US South but all over the country, as well. They have grown the organization and they now helps children serving time in prison without parole and has effectively influenced federal legislation concerning these issues. They provide support to these men and women after they have been released from prison.

Mr. Stevenson shares about how he got started in this career field, the beginning of the EJI, and gives an intimate look at his first few cases.

WHAT’s GOOD: His dedication to serving the poor and unfortunate is amazing.

What’s NOT so good: The descriptions of the justice system willfully acting illegally and with evil intent are maddening.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Just maddening.

RATING: Five slices of pie.

Not that pie in the sky stuff, not a preference for optimism over pessimism, but rather “an orientation of the spirit.” The kind of hope that creates a willingness to position oneself in a hopeless place and be a witness, that allows one to believe in a better future, even in the face of abusive power. That kind of hope makes one strong.

I think my next read will be Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow.

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

All the Birds in the Sky

Thoughts atbitsbycja-jpby Charlie Jane Anders, Recorded Books 2016, 12 hrs 36 minutes

Narrated by Alyssa Bresnahan abnarratoratbits

Challenge: TOB of course!
Genre: Fantasy, I suppose
Type/Source: Audiobook / Audible
 Why I read this now: That is an excellent question, my dear blog, but I’m afraid I have no answer other than that fateful temptress FATE.

MOTIVATION for READING: The TOB. Are you that dense already that you haven’t figured out that all the reading I am doing right now is due to my near nutty obsession with all things Roosterified?!  Plus, it sounded good and it was one of the shortest audiobooks I looked at, methinks. I’m getting a bit annoyed that The Nix is so long and that is the book I want to read next and I feel like I’ve lost some of the reading-mojo I celebrated that last few weeks of December and into January but what is one to do?!

WHAT’s it ABOUT: Are you sitting down? This might take a while and I’m likely to meander.

We meet our protags, Patricia and Laurence, while they are in Middle School. Yep, but of course, our dear protags are the smartest and most picked on and are the misunderstood twerps they usually are in literature but since we readers usually are (or were) ALSO, — we were that kid in Middle School, we love them. Amirite?  cliche?!  too much? no, of course not. We LOVE them. Adorbs.

Did I show you a pic yet of the author? charliejane I want to be her. And my only claim to that devoutness is based on this photo and her blurb on goodreads. Never heard of her before I looked at these two things until I finished this book.

Where was I?

Patricia has had birds and trees talk to her. Laurence is a computer geek; has invented a machine that he hopes will someday have sentience and has also created a 2 second forward-jump time machine. Cool, right?

Unfortunately, before these kidlets realize these things might be valuable to their future, a BAD MAN has figured it out and tries to STOP them!!!!  Blah blah blah – too many spoilers already – they meet again much later, bad dystopia shit happens in the future (um, redundancy, Care!), two or three factions who are all trying to preserve the good things conflict — da da da, true love, machines vs nature!!!

Or IS it… ?

You’ve figured out that Patricia is NATURE and Laurence is MACHINES?!  oh god. I just gave it all away . (I’m counting on the fact that most of you wouldn’t have read this far already.)

Not the most unfaulty of plot lines or execution but BIG FUN.

WHAT’s GOOD: aw, I’m really liking it more in this post writing, I am!

What’s NOT so good: But it dragged just a touch. Just a little bit. I also think it changed tone and/or … something. Momentum? went Middle School nerdy to adultness drag? maybe….

FINAL THOUGHTS:  I liked it. I really did. It’s fun. It’s creative. It’s got a lot of the FUN STUFF: Pro-environment, “the world is fucked”, romance, geeky machine futuristic gadgetry, etc.  I CANNOT WAIT to SEE WHAT THIS GOES AGAINST in the Tournament…. 

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RATING: Four slices of pie. and it had some REALLY good pie mentions.

Tell me I SOLD you on this!  I did, right?!

“Ankle crossed over thigh and lips pursed, as if he just finished a slice of the tartest Meyer Lemon pie.”

Also, WORM PIE. As in diversion from letting it slip about solving the gravity problem to create a stable … WORM PIE!

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Grief is the Thing With Feathers

Thoughts gittwfbymp Graywolf Press 2016, 114 pages

JUST ANNOUNCED! This is on the TOB Short List!

Challenge: TOB Long List and also counting for Poetry 100
Genre: Poetry, Adult Fiction
Type/Source: Tradeback / Library
 Why I read this now: It’s short!

MOTIVATION for READING: I’ve heard good things about this moving story.

WHAT’s it ABOUT:  A man loses his wife, his two sons lose a mother. A crow moves in to help them grieve.

WHAT’s GOOD:  The style, the cadence, the imagery.

What’s NOT so good: I admit that I am not much of a Ted Hughes fan but that is probably because the only thing I know about him is that he was Sylvia Platt’s husband. But I tried to drop my bias because I’m not sure I have given him proper consideration. That said, this book is somewhat based — I’m assuming – on a Hughes’ Crow poem. (I had to google that. Could have been part of the fiction for all I know.)

FINAL THOUGHTS:  I really did enjoy this sad yet hopeful poetic work. It reads very fast. It begs to be read aloud, as I assume poetic works do.

RATING: Four slices of pie. No pie mentioned.

A sample:

Crow

Look at that, look, did I or did I not, oi, look, stab it.
Good book, funny bodies, open door, slam door, spit this, lick that, lift, oi, look, stop it.

Tender opportunity. Never mind, every evening, crack of dawn, all change, all meat this, all meat that, separate the reek. Did I or did I not, ooh, tarmac, macadam. Edible, sticky, bad camouflage.

Strap me to the  mast or I’ll bang her until my mathematics poke out her sorry, sorry, sorry, look! A severed hand, bramble, box of swans, box of stories, piss-arc, better off, must stop shaking, must stay still, mast stay still.

I also wrote down more poets to investigate:  Ibn ‘Arabi, Shostakovich, Osip Mandelstam, R.S.Thomas.
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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Going Gray

Thoughts ggbyak by Anne Kreamer, Little,Brown&Co 2007, 206 pages

Full Title:  Going Gray: What I Learned About Beauty, Sex, Work, Motherhood, Authenticity, and Everything Else That Really Matters

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Challenge: What’s in a Name – Alliteration Category (two words in a title have same starting letter)
Genre: Nonfiction, Memoir? Aging, Fashion
Type/Source: Hard cover / Bookmooch…
 Why I read this now: It’s short!

MOTIVATION for READING: I somewhat remember an article or a review that suggested this book and since it was available on BookMooch, I scooped it up.

WHAT’s it ABOUT:  One woman’s decision to stop dying her hair and how she navigated through all her notions about aging, fashion, attractiveness, and her role in the world now that she was approaching ‘middle age’. It really is mostly her research on gray hair and what it means and not so much personal sharing on all that ‘everything else’ she lists in the extended title.

WHAT’s GOOD:  She does do a bit of research but it is also conducted in a personal way – which I guess is more fun, so I wouldn’t call it an academic study.  It did confirm for me that a female attempting to get a new job after age 50 is S.O.L. It is so sad how we don’t consider and value experience and society wants to ignore old people. Terribly sad.

In fact, she seems to conclude that gray hair is certainly NOT less sexy so we all can feel good about that. But finding a new job will be impossible. New lover? not a problem. Impressive to anyone hiring? not a chance.

What’s NOT so good:  She tends to make a few blanket statements that some careers are more youth-oriented than others but I think it is every job category out there.

FINAL THOUGHTS:  I really need to figure out how to write a best-seller…  or even a moderate-seller. I really am well-suited to the working conditions of being a writer. Now I just need to figure out how to produce something.  Maybe I should write a nonfiction memoir study on some odd topic and then write some self-help books… Do I sound bitter?

RATING:  Two to three slices. It was short, not really memorable and no pie was mentioned.

 

 

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Pie Charts Tables Stats Words, Part 2 2016

By the Numbers…

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Total Books Read = 86
Average Books Read Per Month = 7.17
Best Reading Month = May (10) and December (11)
Worst Reading Month = July (4 books – I was in RI; yea I don’t get it, either.)
Total Pages Read = 22,262
Average Pages/Book = 327.4
Average Pages/Day = 61
Average Pages/Week = 428
Total Chunksters (450+ pages) = 9 (incl 2 Audios > 19.3 hours)

Audiobooks:  Count 19, 254.5 Hours (3 of these I read/listened)
Average Hours/Book: 13 hours
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eoygenres16 (Memoir count is a part of the Nonfiction count…)

Everything and anything I can’t clearly genre-fy, I put in “Contemporary Lit” which, going forward, will be called Adult Fiction. That ‘Other’ category is comprised of ODD, romance, medical fiction (or did I throw these into Adult?), SciFi, children’s, travel, education, reference, history…  And when they are multi-categories, the whole thing collapses! ha.

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Oldest book: Germinal 131 years
Longest book: The Fireman 768 pages
Shortest book: Melinda McPickle
Longest book title: Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of a Fist
Shortest book title: Oreo
DNFs: 3
Debuts: 11
Book to Movie: 1 The Painted Veil
Favorite reading experience: The Tournament of Books March 2016

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And finally… What you’ve all been waiting for!  How many books had PIE?

eoy16piemention

Apple 8, Blueberry 2, Banana Cream 2, Rhubarb 2, Bean Pie 2, Pastry Dough 2, , and Steak & Kidney 2;
Gooseberry, Dewberry, Peach – 1
Fried Green Tomato, Chocolate Chess, Mince Pie and Turkey Pot Pie – 1
Magpies, Moon Pie, Mud Pie, Easy as Pie, Georgie Porgie Pudding and Pie, Pie Charts
and more!

 

OK, I’m done. Only a favorites list to do yet and goals for 2017… Bizzy Bizzy

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Books and Pie aka Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Pie Charts Tables Stats Words, Part 1 2016

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The “IN WORDS” Recap

Books I was excited about and thought I was going to love more: Quiet, Hypocrite in a Pouffy White Dress, Murder Must Advertise, The Devil in the White City, The Abstinence Teacher.

Most surprising book: The Tsar of Love and Techno. LOVED. And the audio narration was not great so I switched to print and am SO GLAD. So very glad. Also, Germinal, State of Wonder, and I Capture the Castle.

Book I pushed the most people to read: Probably The Painted Veil. Perhaps I Capture the Castle – talked my book club into reading it! Crossing to Safety made the rounds at the marina this summer. Am now recommending Homegoing. (READ IT.)

Diversity: I am humbled by what I’ve read to expand the world I know:  some James Baldwin, Paul Beatty’s Man Booker Award and TOB Rooster winner The Sellout (OMG – must read! want to read again), Pulitzer for Fiction winner The Sympathizer, authors: Turner, Rankin, Robinson, Woodson, Gyasi, Bennett. It continues.

Translated works:  3 – Han King’s The Vegetarian from Korean by Deborah Smith, Whatever by Houllebecq’s French by Paul Hammond, Germinal written by Zola and translated from French by Roger Pearson.

I read EIGHT books from the list of 1001+ Books to Read Before I Die. I read 8 last year, too.

Readalongs:  Last year at this post time, I reiterated my interest in reading Germinal and so we did in September – we had a great time! I also bullied my way into a buddy-along for Amsterdam and The Fireman was our almost King-along for 2016. Andi and I ended up reading The Painted Veil (“riggle in amidst the heart strings”) and then right after I tried to read A Little Life with a few bloggers who were also reading it (but I think it fizzled.) Ti of Book Chatter and I read the really strange The New Worlds. Just so you know – The Bone Clocks is happening NOW, The Green Mile postponed indefinitely (but still entertaining the idea), a Trollope of some sort is upcoming and… I’m sure I’ll get wrapped into something else. That Green Mile one will likely happen, I’m sure of it.

The Fireman was a win. Germinal was EXCELLENT. Good times…

HERE IS WHERE I THANK ALL OF YOU READERS AND READALONG PARTICIPANTS AND CHEERLEADERS AND COMMENTERS OF MY BLOG! YOU ROCK!  SMOOCHES AND KISSES AND HUGS {{{XOXOXO}}}

If I convinced you to read something and you loved it, YAY!!!  and if you convinced me to read something, THANK YOU.

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Most Read Author:  Barbara Claypole White – a new friend; I’m a big fan. I read her ENTIRE oeuvre Last year it was Rachel Joyce.

Fifty-eight authors were NEW to me. Of the others, 11 were a third (or more, but 3 was majority) time to sample. I read (possibly reread) an Agatha Christie; I read a ton of her stuff years ago. I reread To Kill a Mockinbird – and could have counted it as my reread of a HS classic but decided to use it in the BANNED BOOK category slot instead.

I fell in love with Ann Patchett, Anthony Marra, Wallace Stegner, and apparently Barbara Claypole White. (She’s adorable and spunky and lives in NC.)

I ended up reading three books by Ann Patchett in 2016:  Happy Marriage, State of Wonder, Commonwealth.

Challenges: I continue to rock out on my Classics Club 50, finishing year 2 of 5 very strong. I completed 9 of the 12 in the Back to the Classics Challenge and am happy with it. I completed the What’s in a Name and will continue with all of these in 2017. I am adding the Poetry Challenge.

Debuts: I did a crappy job of keeping track of this. I can say that I enjoyed new fiction by Angela Flournoy, Brit Bennett, Yaa Gyasi, and Scott Hawkins.

Raspberries to my efforts to watch and report on Books to Movie. I did enjoy The Painted Veil and recommend it highly – book and film. I did manage to watch The Book Thief and thought it well done.

Pie Mentions: Lots! I failed to track [snow day! guess what I’ve been doing!!] in my spreadsheet by book title (nor very accurately or collectably in goodreads) but only recorded in my reviews. Which means I need to go through all of these reviews [now done!] to see which books or how many mention pie. Maybe. Maybe I will do that or only vow to do better going forward.  ==>  57% of the books I read this year mention pie.

Crossing to Safety wins the PIE IN LITERATURE Award:

“When you’re nailing a custard pie to the wall, and it starts to wilt, it doesn’t do any good to hammer in more nails.”

If I were to guess, apple pie was mentioned more than any other kind of pie. I love Barbara Claypole White for the many pies she mentions, especially Orange-Rhubarb. Fate and Furies had some terrific pie mentions. Bennett’s The Mothers had a great pie scene and Germinal had more pie mentions than one might expect.

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Unintended Themes in my Readings:  I didn’t / can’t identify anything. Other than maybe my obsession with the Tournament of Books?  [Updated now that I’ve looked at EVERY book review post.] I had more than a few books with thought-provoking looks at the concept of death and dying. I might want to consider that I read more than a few odd or quirky books this year, too.

Interesting aka Odd Tidbit:  I didn’t read ANYTHING by Stephen King. I did read a book by his son Joe Hill though, and had a very funny exchange with my Auntie when I gave her my copy of The Fireman. My Auntie lives in Maine – this might be important or give credence to this situation. Auntie did not realize that the author of The Fireman was the son of King. I didn’t think to tell her! She accused me of holding out and NOT telling her. It amused me… I’m still rather shocked that I didn’t get any King read in 2016.

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Poetry in 2017

Poetry Baby!

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I’m going for 100 poems. Not sure what I constitute what a ‘poem’ is compared to what others might say a poem is but maybe that’s the others problem and not mine.

AND… in that spirit, I googled “What is a poem” fully expecting to find a poem or an answer of some sort in poem form. I found this. It links the site (The Atlantic) I borrowed it from:

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I am of the opinion that this answer would look like a fine poem if in a layout/setup that would give the impression of a poem…

The reason I am choosing to make poetry a priority in 2017 can be placed at the feet of Cheryl Strayed. Her advice column book, Tiny Beautiful Things, strongly suggested that poetry is a good solution for what ails ya. This has stuck with me. It feels like a worthy goal and one I’ve never attempted in all my focus on New Year Affirmations and whatnot. Or at least, not stated in public.

I share POEM #1 in my count to 100. I found it today in my current read, Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson. It is written by Ian E. Manuel of Union Correctional Institute in Florida. He is a harshly penalized prison inmate for a deed committed when he was young, uncared for, lost. I have compassion for his situation. His poem is beautiful.

UNCRIED TEARS

Imagine teardrops left uncried
From pain trapped inside
Waiting to escape
Through the windows of your eyes

“Why won’t you let us out?”
The tears question the conscience
“Relinquish your fears and doubts
And heal yourself in the process.”

The conscience told the tears
“I know you really want me to cry
But if I release you from bondage,
In gaining your freedom you die.”

The tears gave it some thought
Before giving the conscience an answer
“If crying brings you to triumph
Then dying’s not such a disaster.”

Please share poets and poetry compilations that will not intimidate but instruct, inspire not confound. Thank you.

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Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.