I Finished What’s in a Name 8 for 2015 #WiaN15

wian15

This is my personal favorite of Reading Challenges. I eagerly await the category announcements for the coming year and scrounge books on my shelf that will suffice.

This year, I was able to read multiple books in a few categories!

Here is the post where I announce my options for the 8th round for year 2015.

Here are the books I ended up reading for the categories:

  • Words ending with INGMockingjay, Far From the Madding Crowd, The Making of a Marchioness (still need to someday read: First You Try Everything by Jane McCaffery, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay – Chabon (I just bought the audio! so probably will get to in 2016 if not this year yet), or Music for a Torching by AMHomes)
  • ColorColor by Victoria Finlay (option not chosen: Vreeland’s Girl in Hyacinth Blue)
  • Familial Relationship – Winner: Sister Carrie (losers:  The Family Orchard by Nomi Eve, The Kingmaker’s Daughter by Philippa Gregory)
  • Body of Water – It was a BIG FAT YES for my option of Margaret Atwood’s Year of the Flood. Plus two more qualifiers: Lost Lake, Fog Island Mountains; (Two Rivers by T.Greenwood – sorry, maybe later.)
  • CityThe Boston Girl, Mansfield Park, Winesburg Ohio, The Bookseller of Kabul; (still waiting on that shelf: Hard City by Clark Howard)
  • AnimalThe Good Lord Bird, H is for Hawk, The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery (Not this time Ape House – Sara Gruen)

I think I may have overdone it. I could even count a few more titles that had words with ING: like Wings and Things. Goodness, the poor color category only got one book. A very successful challenge attempt. (Just writing this post makes me excited that we are only two months away from end of year posts!)

Will you be playing along in 2016?

pieratingsml

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.
Advertisements

The Elegance of the Hedgehog

Thoughts teothbymb The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery, Europa Editions 2008 (orig 2006), 325 pages

For wian15 What’s in a Name 8 Reading Challenge

Thank you Holly for giving me this book (in 2012).

Thank you Katie for cheering me along as I read this! So it was somewhat of a buddy read although I was the only one reading/hashtagging (#HedgehogElegance) and Katie was the TWEET-TO for all the fun tweetable quips and quotes that entertained and/or amused me.

“People aim for the stars, and they end up like goldfish in a bowl. I wonder if it wouldn’t be simpler just to teach children right from the start that life is absurd.”

What it’s ABOUT:  A concierge of a high-society apartment complex (of 5 units) keeps to herself and works hard to build an image of the lowly dumb building caretaker stereotype – NOT that I have such. The only concierges I know are for fancy hotels so it was a bit difficult to buy-in to an assumed stereotype when I don’t have it. Still, she is good at explaining herself as hiding her true passions of literature, music and cinema.

“She has the same simple refinement as the hedgehog: deceptively indolent little creature, fiercely solitary – and terribly elegant.”

In alternating chapters, we meet a 12 year old resident of the building who feels like she doesn’t belong into the world she is born in, or in any world for that matter and she is extremely bright and thoughtful.

“But if you dread tomorrow, it’s because you don’t know how to build the present, and when you don’t know how to build the present, you tell yourself you can deal with it tomorrow, and it’s a lost cause anyway because tomorrow always ends up becoming today, don’t you see?”

I WAS entertained and amused. I can see why some might think it ‘pretentious’ but I thought it was merely a perfect part of the character descriptions and not of the author nor a story issue.

I had been wanting to read this for a long time and had it often on the NEXT-BOOK shelf but it kept getting shuffled aside for whatever hot glamorous book had to be read. I think I was afraid that I wouldn’t like it because I knew I had high expectations. I waited, also, to let the hype die down in the blogging world and in my brain, hoping to forget anything/everything.

Still, I had still had glimmers of expectation threatening my enjoyment. And I was wrong about a few things. Darn it! I thought it was about an odd  friendship between the caretaker and the little girl. Yes, but NO – it happened SO LATE in the book, I was rather confused!  so do know that going in.

“I have always been fascinated by the abnegation with which we human beings are capable of devoting a great deal of energy to the quest for nothing and to the rehashing of useless and absurd ideas.”

So much good stuff. A favorite book to add to my list.

“We live each day as if it were merely a rehearsal for the  next…”

Rating:  FIVE slices of pie.

TONS of new vocab words, too. I won’t define for you; I only starred these as I read along. A few I did put on Twitter.

Sidereal, deontology, furbelow, consonant, salvo, asthenic, demiurge, exeunt, syncretism, debility, subaltern, factotum*, incunabulum, eructation…

* I plan on using — factotum — in my NaNoWriMo work. Gots to! Definition is: A person whose job involves doing many different types of work. This is me.

pieratingsml

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

H is for Hawk

Thoughts hifhbyhm H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald, Random House Audio 2014, 11 hours 6 minutes

I’m already declaring this a TOP READ/LISTEN for 2015!

Anonymous Interviewer aka AI: Care, how did you come to read this?

Care: I saw a tweet announcing it as an Audible special for $2.99. Since, I knew I had only a few hours left of my current audiobook and lots of days left in the month to await my next credit, I jumped.

AI: Did you know anything about it? Had you read any good reviews?

Care: Excellent question because no, I didn’t really know much about it but yes, I do think I had read positive things? I DID know that the title fits the What’s in a Name Challenge for the animal category, so it has that going for it.

AI: I thought you were going to read Elegance of the Hedgehog for WiaN8.

Care: So did I, but it just kept getting passed over by my mood to read something else. I do hope to read Hedgehog someday but maybe not anytime soon, I guess.

AI: So what’s the Hawk book about?

Care: H is for Hawk is a fascinating overlapping memoir — and more! It is part nature book, falconry how-to book, grief exploration book and part biography of TH White, the author of The Once and Future King.

AI: So this is memoir?

Care: Yes, nonfiction. (I admit, I didn’t know this until after I started listening to the book.)

AI: Tell us about the author.

Care: Sure, and I first must say if I haven’t already, that the author does an EXCELLENT job narrating her own book.

AI: Is this unusual?

Care: What, that authors narrate their own books or that they actually do this successfully?

AI: Yea, that.

Care: I think Neil Gaiman is one author that does a great job and I have found that entertainers such as comedians always seem to do a very good job narrating their own books, but I can’t say that Donna Tartt pulled off a successful narration. (I did manage to listen all the way to the end of the 16 hour plus audio of The Secret History! YAY ME.)

Care: May I interrupt to give a NEVERWHERE READALONG SHOUT OUT? Nancy is doing a readalong if anyone has ever wanted to read this – I highly recommend the audiobook. My review is here.

AI: Do you have a button to share or maybe a hashtag for Twitter?

Care: As a matter of fact, I do know the hashtag #NeverwhereRAL, but I don’t know about a button. And if you click on the words a few sentences ago about the readalong shout out, you’ll open a window at Nancy’s blog…

AI: OK, tell us more about Helen Macdonald.

Care: Ms. Macdonald, a British naturalist writer, is a college professor who has also been interested in falconry since a very young age. There is also a terrific photo of Mabel on her blog (which may or may not be active; it looks like the events might be for 2014, a year done passed.)

AI: Um, Mabel? Who is Mabel?

Care: Mabel is her goshawk! Macdonald says in her book that if you give a goshawk a mild meek-sounding name, they usually turn out to be terrific hunters! (and vice versa.) Here’s a photo of another goshawk that I found on the internet:

goshawk <– Sindbad the Goshawk, photo credit to The International Falconry Forum

AI: To be totally honest, this book sounds not only boring but slightly depressing, even with a lovely named bird like Mabel.

Care: And you would be wrong. This book is delightful. It has ALL the feelings. Sure, it is about how she went through the stages of grief after losing her father but it also has many funny almost comic moments – also, angry and frightening. Her writing is beautiful, provocative. She is known as a naturalist writer for good reason. She is just an excellent writer! She is smart, she is tender, she is strong, she is brave and she shares every bit of it with eloquence.

And you learn about so much stuff that you didn’t even know you wanted to know about. THAT is a great book.Helen Macdonald

AI: Care to share a quote or two?

Care:

“And I found there were myriad definitions of this thing called tragedy that had wormed its way through the history of literature; and the simplest of all was this: that it is the story of a figure who, through some moral flaw or personal failing, falls through force of circumstance to his doom.”

AI: I have nothing else to ask, maybe your readers will have more questions. This concludes this audiobook review presentation interrogation. Thank you.

Care: Thank YOU.

pieratingsml

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Mansfield Park

Thoughts mpbyja Mansfield Park by Jane Austen, Naxos Audio 2007 (orig 1814), 16 hours 49 minutes

Narrated by the incomparable professional Juliet Stevenson.

FOR CLASSICS CLUB SPIN!!

  “I fancy Miss Price has been more used to deserve praise than to hear it.”

This is the most fun book full of love-to-loath characters! Had a grand time with Jane and her character descriptions of the “too good” (Fanny Price) and deliciously bad (Auntie Mrs. Norris). I even started to admire Lady Bertram at one point. Of course, Edmund was only slightly less annoying than Fanny and the Crawfords!  OH YES!  Miss Mary and her darling flirtatious conniving brother Henry!!!  Such fun. Could NOT understand how Edmund put up with Mary… She was so insulting and it would go right over his head; he thought her heavenly and sweet. (She certainly was neither.)

Jane Austen’s ability to be cool and snide is beyond compare.

Rating: fourpie

READ for CITY category for the What’s In a Name Challenge. My SECOND entry. Mansfield is a town in Massachusetts.

READ for CLASSICS CLUB 50 and VERY LONG category of the Classics Challenge.

pieratingsml

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The Good Lord Bird

Thoughts tglbbyjm The Good Lord Bird by James McBride, (2013,417 pages)

Do you like HISTORICAL FICTION?

Do you appreciate National Book Award Winners?

Did you ever read The Color of Water (and liked it)?

Do you appreciate wry humor and satire?

I recommend this book. Everyone in our club enjoyed it (though our discussion* was a bit boring comparatively.)

This is a fascinating rollicking-good time read that will make you laugh and learn a lot about an interesting event and personality in U.S. History: The Raid on Harpers Ferry by John Brown. You also get cameos of Harriet Tubman (vote for her to be on the $20 bill?) and Frederick Douglass.

I know of John Brown because of this raid but also because he was known for fighting for Kansas’ right to NOT have slaves in the border wars with Missouri before the Civil War. My club asked me if I studied John Brown in my Kansas schooling years but I can’t remember. How/why do I know of John Brown? Not sure.

I do think of a mural in the Kansas State House so maybe I saw it first on a tour? I really don’t remember if I did a school field trip to Topeka while in grade school, but I know I have seen this:

image

The narrator of the story is a very young black slave, possibly age ~10, that is “freed” by Brown in one of the Kansas raids and he stays with Brown because he really has no place else to go. The odd thing is, the Brown is confused at the beginning, thinking that our boy named Henry is actually a girl named Henrietta. So Henry keeps up the ruse for a variety of reasons. In fact, one of the themes explored in this, in addition to race and slavery, is identity. McBride is a brilliant author on many levels, in my opinion, and I will now read everything he writes. Or, I want to; he’s now on the list.     image

Do know, I am one of those that laughs when most inappropriate, I see the absurd in the sad situations to thus avoid the crying. So it’s not that I love laughing at serious subjects, but. I do, I guess. I think that is why I like satire. (when I get it!)

If you want something a little different, something historical (researching this, it seems the author was quite attune to many of the true facts while having a creative imagination for the rest of it.) READ this book!

Rating: Five slices of Buttered Apple Pie.

pieratingsml

Other reviews:  Naomi’s at Consumed by Ink and Rory’s at Fourth Street Review.

* Factoid that I didn’t know until book club:  a few of the ladies (of a generation (or two) prior to mine) started to sing a song “John Brown’s body lies a-mouldering in the grave” to the tune of the Battle Hymn of the Republic. Apparently Julia Ward Howe wrote the lyrics to the Battle Hymn after hearing the John Brown version. Our book club leader passed out paperwork of her research and had us sing a few verses! Too funny.

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The Year of the Flood

Thoughts tyotfbyma The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood,

Satisfies the WATER category of the What’s in a Name 8 Challenge.

Unfortunately, though I do remember Jimmy in the tree and the blue people, I do not recall much of Oryx and Crake and what all happened in MaddAddam Part 1. Not that my memory failure contributed in any way to my enjoyment (or not) of this Part 2 but I wish I could remember more.

I do find Atwood’s books amazing. She is a very talented and creative story teller.

“…the reason you can’t really imagine yourself being dead was that as soon as you say, ‘I’ll be dead,’ you’ve said the word I, and so you’re still alive inside the sentence. And that’s how people got the idea of the immortality of the soul – it was a consequence of grammar.”  

My advice? if you like Atwood and you like dystopia and you have yet to read this 3 book series, just gather them in and read in a timely manner.

If you haven’t read either Book 1 or Book 2, there is probably no reason I can think of to say that you MUST read O&C first. You could likely read Flood first and then read O&C and enjoy it just as much.

It’s all about different perspectives on how humans are destroying the Earth. And yet she always manages to bring out the best in people just as she describes how awful we humans can be.

I don’t recall how O&C ended but this one was abrupt and unsatisfying. I didn’t throw it across the room or anything but I did groan in slight frustration. Now I should go get MaddAddam, Book 3 and get it over with but I won’t. I know myself too well.

I just get distracted by all the books I already have and want to read and before I know it, years will have flown by. On the other hand, I bet the library might actually have this…

 

Rating: fourpie Four slices of turnip pie. I actually made a turnip/parsnip/potato pie last month and it was quite tasty. Not pretty to look at though.

 

pieratingsml

 

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

 

Color: A Natural History of the Palette

Thoughts cbyvf Color by Victoria Finlay, Random House Trade 2004 (orig 2002), 448 pages

Satisfies the COLOR category of the What’s in a Name 8 Challenge.

“Up until then I had always believed that the world was getting better and better and more and more clever. But that day my tender theory about the Evolution of History fell on its head, and it has – for better or for worse – never been quite right ever since.”  p. 1

Wow – what a wild ride! This book is nuts.

I learned a lot and I marveled at what the author went through to gather stories to fit into this book. She wanted to find India Indigo so she went there. She wanted to find Tyrian Purple, so she went to Lebanon. She just had to see the blue Lapis Lazuli mines of Afghanistan, so off she went. Think about that last one…

She is fearless!

My only complaint might be that she really is all over the place at times and I wondered why she would mention that. (off on a tangent much?)  I had to go look up SO MANY THINGS. It is hard – she mentions this, too – it is very hard to describe colors with words.

This is a 4 slice of pie book. fourpie If you like travel books and author-involved nonfiction adventures, I recommend. If you are an artist and are curious about how artists got their colors, you must read this book.

I still have my receipt from purchasing this in 2010. Why? What prompted this book then? I have no records except the date. HOWEVER, in looking for other reviews out there in blogland, I found that Eva of A Striped Armchair was extremely enthusiastic about this book, so that is a clue. And since I seem to be on a linky-love binge, I should include Fyrefly’s discussion of another Finlay book that am now wanting to read next/soon/someday.

Colors are fascinating; this book makes me crave the colors of the entire world and makes me wonder what others really are looking at – do we see the same thing? Is the blue I see the blue you see? What color of purple do you think Cleopatra dyed her sails? And how exactly did she do it? So many mysteries.

Tyndall’s explanation of why the sky is blue is one of the best ever. Page 305.

copleyl-1

Lots of Copley Connections for me, too.  Of course, she mentions Simon Garfield’s Mauve which I read in 2009. Or the mention of the English town of Newcastle-upon-Tyne being known for its beer exports. (I read all about that in Hops & Glory.) And then on page 384, Finlay describes a cave with a ‘millenia of snail trails’; surely those of you who read All the Light We Cannot See, recognize Marie-Laure and her hiding place?

Do you have any nonfiction books about colors to recommend? Just one more of my favorite things to learn more about, I guess. AND, I will send this book to anyone who comments and says they want it. If more than one person wants it, I will select somebody at random. Must comment before Valentines Day.

pieratingsml

 

 

 

* Copley Connections are the random connections and coincidences that link books that I have read.

 

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Sister Carrie Wrap Up #CarrieAlong

Thoughts scbytd by Theodore Dreiser, Bantam Classic 1984 (orig 1900), 400 pages.

From E.L.Doctorow’s Introduction:

And so in 1899, Theodore Dreiser, age twenty-eight, wrote the title “Sister Carrie” on a piece of paper, and having no idea what it meant, proceeded to compose the book to find out.

Love when I find authors who just write and let stories and characters reveal themselves.

EDITED for quick blurb as to what this is about; stolen word for word from Jill. Link to her review can be found later in this post.

The basic story goes like this: small town girl moves to big city. Finds a menial job, hates it. Gets picked up by a charming salesman, he buys her shiny things, she shacks up with him, the afore-mentioned ass shows up and wants some of that, they plan to runaway together, she finds out he’s married, he kidnaps her and so they still end up running away together, he stops buying her shiny things, he loses his job and stays home in his tatty clothes all day, she becomes an actress, dumps his ass, and buys her own shiny things. Rocking chair. The end.

Trish tweets: “boo!!! … Finished on plane. Did not like ending! So unhappy. 😦 ”

Unhappy? You expected HAPPY?! 

My response: “I took it more contemplative and “far away”. Guess now I will have to do a post. :).

So, I didn’t expect happy. I expected RUIN and SHAME. Well, we don’t quite get that. Ruin, yes: for Mr. Hurstwood. No shame. More like “Shit happens.” Shrug.

The Introduction is fabulous, by the way*. He states, (and Trish? this might explain the theme that runs through it all)

“Longing, the hope for fulfillment is the one unwavering passion of the world’s commerce. Dreiser is of two minds about this passion. To a populace firmly in the grip of material existence, the desire for something more is a destructive energy that can never be exhausted; it is doom. Hurstwood, whose success as manager of  high-class drinking establishments is not sufficient, fixes his further ambition on Carrie, and is ruined. But the desire of something more, the longing for fulfillment, is also hope, and therefore innocence, a sort of redemption. Carrie at the top of her profession, is left looking for something more, and though we understand she will never find it – no more than Hurstwood has, her recognition that she in unfulfilled is the closest thing to grace in the Dreiser theology.”

When I say that I took it “far away”, I meant that I could imagine this on film where the camera zooms out and away from Carrie in her rocking chair to view the entire city, the whole globe spinning away in the ‘longing’ and never finding contentment. This race to achieve and accumulate more more MORE is what is immoral.

I was SO GLAD that Dreiser drops in an update on Mrs. Hurstwood and her success on her material gains goal and I found it humorous that Drouet was still oblivious and yet successful. (He didn’t ‘grow’ but could still dine and dress the fashion.)

I couldn’t get past the pronunciation of Drouet every time I had to read it in my head. Drew – eh?  Of course, I can’t help but think of the chipmonks every time I say Theodore. In my head. THEODORE

The Mr. Ames guy was odd. I get it and I’m sure there is a word for this kind of literary device for dropping in a character to move the story along and be significant but not a major player in the story. But it was odd.

Aw, heck. Carrie was a twit and she annoyed me to NO end. Really, dearheart?  Imagining Carrie’s thoughts: “Oh golly, Mr. Drouet is starting to bore me but I suppose I should be grateful for what nice things he is buying me…”

Word in the Intro states that Mr. Dreiser’s wife and editor tried to totally excise ALL references to any sexuality in book. I would say they succeeded. This was another interesting amusing bit that maybe what was not being mentioned was or was NOT important…  Nothing at all was said! It felt weird that it wasn’t’ intentionally left out but just ‘not there’.

And where the heck is Carrie’s mother? Where is Carrie’s idea that perhaps, something about this plan or LACK of plan might not be a good idea? la di da…    Um wait. Mr. Hurstwood is MARRIED?!?!  why the hell would this little problem bug Carrie so much when all the other little problems barely make a blip of a conscious thought of possible catastrophe?

The story of Carrie is hardly one of right and wrong, is it? Certainly, it’s not presented as a simple morality tale. Was Dreiser judging the basest of desires to be that we can’t be content or that we are too greedy and selfish and maybe we should try to be kinder along the way?

Also interesting to me is that the Introduction states that Family gets a pretty cynical view in this book, too. I would say he was cynical about a lot of things.

AND….  you may have seen my tweet about Dreiser and how he just might subscribe to the Law of Attraction. Or at least to how I understand the explanations of money as energy concept. “When each individual realizes for himself that this thing primarily stands for and should only be accepted as a moral due – that it should be paid out as honestly stored energy, and not as a usurped privilege – man of our social, religious and political trouble will have permanently passed.” Is it our THOUGHTS about what money is or isn’t that is the problem?

Finally, are the descriptions of the “HAVEs” and “HAVE NOTs” any different now versus then? Don’t young girls run off to the big city now and get sucked into a life of depravity just to have lovely trinkets? Too simple, right? Wouldn’t Carrie just be a terrific reality TV star… Um, no. Not sure she would have enough mindless babble for the cameras. But do you think this could EASILY be remade into a film set in today’s world?

Who is ready to watch the 1952 film?  carrie52film I want to see if for the costumes…

I think this book would be an excellent book club choice.

PIE MENTION on page 125: “he stopped with a mouthful of pie poised on a fork before her face.”

Four stars!  fourpie

REVIEW ROUNDUP:
Literary Odyssey
Jill’s Somewhere in a Book
Behold the Stars  <–fabulous and thorough review!!
Trish/TriniCapini’s Love Laughter Insanity
(yours? let me know)

Counts for the What’s in a Name 8 Challenge for family relationship category.

* Who wants my copy of this book – I’ll send it?

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

January 2015 Recap

My agenda for today’s meeting post is as follows:

Sister Carrie
Book Club/s
Pies
Shakespeare
Gardens
Whatever Else I Think Of That Doesn’t Fit in Any Previously Mentioned Category

pieratingsml

Hello! Hello! Happy SnowStorm up in my ol’ prior place of living!! (They got a storm if you didn’t hear) and I was not sad to miss it. I enjoyed all the Facebook posts and pics, I really did. We had sunshine and almost warm?  It was 45 degrees so it was fine with me.

I finished Sister Carrie last week and I really enjoyed it. I can tell that Mr. Dreiser was an original thinker – at least compared to my grandparents, maybe? He was bold and he was moralistic but he was also a free-thinker about lots of stuff and I really enjoyed how the story played.

The “Oh Carrie! Oh Carrie!!” at the very end was TERRIFIC!! Am thinking some of that paragraph would make a good epitaph on my pink marble headstone some 40+ years hence. I loved that piece so much that I found the free audiobook online and zoomed forward just to hear the last few paragraphs of the book. This is MY kind of classic:  historical, dramatic, bold. I was surprised. I think I say that a LOT. Why do we think this classics are going to be boring or dry?!?!  Oh We Silly TwentyFirstCenturions….

More on this — I hope!  If somebody wants to volunteer a post for a Sister Carrie #CarrieAlong Readalong Summation — even if in February!!, let me know and we will gather there and share, converse, chat, kibbitz, etc. Or we can set a date and tweet and/or do a watchalong of the movie. It’s on Amazon Prime, fyi…

pieratingsml

I joined a book club. My local library has a book club and I crashed it for January. They were most surprised!  Don’tcha love it?  Of course, they were!!  When I stopped by in December, the librarians thrust Invisible: in my hand and I read it and I really didn’t like it much. But — of course!! — I went to the library chat! That’s how I roll. I was the youngest person there but I am embarrassed* to say that I wasn’t the youngest by much. I’m getting old and I do NOT like it. I just might be the kind of person who boycotts my own surprise birthday party that I plan just in case no one thinks to surprise me with one. Actually one reason why I moved is because I both require and dread a surprise 50th birthday party in equal measure. I am SUCH a Gemini. (insert dramatic sigh here).

This book club had a moderator!  We actually talked about the book!!  Crazy.  Good times. I loved it. We are going to read The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd for next time. The library provides the books! Again, shock and awe. AWESOME. Funny story: the library tried to give the group The Good Earth ** by Pearl S Buck but they insisted that the library had the list wrong or misunderstood. They are certain that the next book was to be The Good _(something I forget)_ by one of those ‘popler’*** authors that I can’t ever remember…

So far, Invention of Wings is really good!!!!  I’m 20% in or so. Also , must say, I really like all the improvements that goodreads.com rolls out. They are working for me.

MORE.  I have two more book clubs I am going to “sample” to see if I like the ladies  – OH! that sounds horrible!  if I ‘click’ with the clubbers?!  can I say that??!!?!   I have to read The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry before Feb 5 – yikes!  And also, The Husband’s Secret before Feb 20. THAT I can do because it will be my next audiobook.

yes, yes, I still have to apply for teaching jobs. I’m ON it!!

pieratingsml

Last Friday was PIE DAY. I do hope you all got some pie. I made a coffee pudding with meringue which unfortunately sounds better than it was (but the pudding part was orgasmic – yes I said that.) and I also made a Curry Vegetable Pie which was QUITE GOOD (please say that out loud with a Brit accent) but unfortunately was not photo worthy.

IMG_0883

The next pie day might be March 14… 3.14 National-Pi-Day But I might be missing some important pie days soon…

June 9 is Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Day – you all should be aware of this.

pieratingsml

I just finished Shakespeare’s The Winter Tale on audio. I like Shakespeare, I do. I love the flow and rhythm and language of Shakespeare. Remarkable on some many literary levels, it astounds me. I wish I could have cultivated an appreciation for Dear Bill while a teen. But, alas, I did not. (I blame that on the death of my Thespian ambitions in Junior High, oh well.)

First, I know NOTHING about this play. I had to look up what it all meant during listening. I do now want to see a live performance.

I am counting this as my non review and for the Classics Challenge.  I liked it and give it 4 stars. It’s only 3 hours if anyone also needs a good play classic!!!  Actually, it really was well done. Did I mention -oops- Sir John Gielgud.   yes~?~

pieratingsml

I went to a Garden Information Night Event at the library. It was a North Carolina Extension presentation. They told me what plants I can plant when – very exciting! I’m excited!  I want to grow beets and garlic and tomatoes and other yummies.

I’m also obsessed with house plants. I had to give most of mine away in the move because it was too much stress to move them. I deposited many with good friends. Hope they are adjusted and loved. I’m accumulating more and hope I can do well. I don’t have the best of a green thumb but I do love house plants. You are supposed to have a house plant for every 10 square feet of house, you know. Best for clean air.

pieratingsml

I really thought I had more to say. Guess not. Anyone have any questions? Any motions to adjourn?

g’Night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Should be embarrassed to even to attempt bragging about being the youngest – what does this mean?!

** “There’s a life force to this book that a review can’t capture.”  <– I said that in my review. Huh.

*** POPLER = popular. Something adorable my cute second cousin uttered when she was about 9 yo and telling her mother that everyone just seemed to like her….

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Mockingjay

Thoughts mjbysc Mockingjay (Hunger Games #3) by Suzanne Collins, Scholastic Press 2010, 390 pages eBook

QUALIFIES: The -ing category of What’s in a Name 8 and also the animal category. I’m going to count it for ING.

RATING:  Three slices of pie.

Lots of violence and still a sullen Katniss. She finally picks a team. Actually, I’m just glad this is (almost) over. Ready to see the movie and be able to say, “Done.”

If I had to pick a favorite, I would say the first one.

(Looks like I’m still in a mini-review mode. Don’t worry – am gathering lots of things to say about Sister Carrie!)

pieratingsml

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.