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Recent Thoughts and Other Things…

I’ve read 4 books since my last review post and finished up May strong with 8 books (one of which was a skim from half point…)

Total for the year so far:  39 books, 9672 pages, ~147 hours

I decided a quick audiobook (< 3 hours) was just the thing to catapult my month’s stats to something I can be proud of and chose Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things to Me It was both unexpected and affirming; she is an eloquent voice for feminism and human rights. I very much enjoyed this. I was also pleased that she lent insight to Virginia Woolf’s Orlando

I DNF’d Orlando Sob, shame, embarrassment. It is NOT a summer beach read; it is dense and though very lively, it takes concentration. I admit I was lost and believe this would be a great book for serious study just not right now in the moment of my crazy life. I had originally attempted the audiobook – nope. Reading the ebook was easier, but… I can’t quite describe the feeling of drowning it gave me. Submerged in what I can only assume is amazing prose but HUH? I need guidance for next time. And I do want to try again. It’s not dry and dusty; it is very lively, but hold on! Goodness.

My neighbor gave me a book written by a friend of hers from a writing group she was involved with. I must say that it was well-written and informative, fascinating even.  I know many will and should enjoy it. It just wasn’t my cup of tea in style and format; I guess genre. I like the heavier serious immersive stuff. (How I can say that I liked The Sport of Kings when I didn’t like it but I can “like” this but not? Does that make any sense whatsoever? Nah, I didn’t think so.) I can find much to admire and can recommend Holly Warah’s debut Where Jasmine Blooms I give it 3 slices of pie. (It did have lots of pie so I could bump up to a 4 slice?)  I now must get my hands on a recipe for SAMBUSIK PIE.

Finally, my MIL gave me  A Long Way Home by Saroo Brierly and I read it in one day. What an amazing story! If you have seen or  know about the movie Lion, you know what this is:  young boy finds himself on a train to Calcutta, many MANY miles away from home. He is adopted by a family in Australia and when he is 30, he decides to find out about his birth-family. WOW!!

I’m listening to Everything I Never Told You and honestly, I’m not feeling it. Shrug. I’m about 35% in. Maybe I’m just in a horrible mood this summer!? No, that can’t be all of it — I have Kitchens of the Great Midwest on ebook and I am finding it delightful.

Finally. School is out and we are headed to the boat and the lovely waters of Rhode Island. You may not see me around here much… Wishing everyone a super summer and lots of great reading!

pieratingsml

Copyright © 2007-2017. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The World According to Garp

Thoughts twatgbyji by John Irving, Random House Audio 2006 (orig 1978), with epilogue read by author dated 1998

Narration by Michael Prichard, 20 hours 26 minutes

Challenge:  Classics Club
Genre: Contemporary Lit
Type/Source: Audiobook / Audible
 Why I read this now: Finally, its time had come.

MOTIVATION for READING: I have wanted to read this for a long time. Funny, I can’t really remember why I didn’t read it right away when my occasionally demanding father forbade me to read this book. This book in particular. No other books were included nor was a reason given that I recall. And by ‘occasionally demanding’, I mean that he didn’t often tell me what to “do/not do” but when he did, it always seemed random and interesting in comparison to other similar things he didn’t tell me I couldn’t do.

The funny thing to me, is that I don’t think this book was ever on my radar as a teen or young adult (Odd? I would have been 13 when this book was published and 17 when the movie came out — which I also have yet to see). In fact, for a long time, I thought this book was written by John Updike. So, you see, I really didn’t think it was a book for me anyway and rather than rushing to read it to find out why I wasn’t supposed to like any other normal teenager, I filed it away in my head. Wrongly, but still it sat there waiting for me. In fact, it was Dewey, I think, who corrected or suggested that I was probably not referring to John Updike as an author likely to be the degenerate influence I had presumed. I have never read Updike either. Should I?

I was a kid who seriously believed that lightening bolts would strike if I was deliberately disobedient. I believed in that far longer than I ever believed in Santa Claus, if I ever did.

All this to say that it took me a long time out of respect for my father’s wishes, I suppose, for me to ever decide I should read John Irving. I have read A Prayer for Owen Meany thanks to a readalong – loved it. And thanks to Owen Meany, I eventually came around to knowing I would someday read and love Garp. And boy did I! I did. (Now I want to reread Owen. Sigh…)

WHAT’s it ABOUT:  OK, back to Garp… This book is about an interesting woman wanting to live life on her terms. It’s about her son, Garp. It’s about Garp growing up wanting to be a writer. He gets married, has children. He tries to protect his family from the all that could happen in a scary life in the scary world. (Maybe that is what my father was trying to do.) It’s about family, life and death, and dealing with death.

WHAT’s GOOD: The imagination. The deadpan humor. The absurdity. It feels to me like Irving is a master at making the absurd totally believable. When I see that quote of Neil Gaiman: “Things need not have happened to be true.“ — I tend to think of Irving. And WOW people! this is a timely book. A reminder that feminism is just getting started and still has a long way to go. A reminder that in some things, we were ahead of the times AND that we have slipped in our understandings. Feminism, transsexuals, rape culture, politics, open-mindedness, what is “family”? Garp was an authentic passionate talented guy who loved fiercely.

Books like this remind me that there were no “good ol’ days”; that humans can be vile, have always been vile, will continue to be vile; and yet still, humans can be kind.

What’s NOT so good:  That even though I never saw the movie (yet – maybe even tonight, most likely this weekend), I still kept seeing John Lithgow as Roberta Muldoon. Not all the time, but often enough to hear his voice and see his face, with lipstick and rouge. That really isn’t a criticism and I probably shouldn’t mention it…

No pie was mentioned that was noticed.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Beware the undertoad.

RATING: Five slices of pie.

 

 

pierating

Copyright © 2007-2016. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Sister Carrie Wrap Up #CarrieAlong

Thoughts scbytd by Theodore Dreiser, Bantam Classic 1984 (orig 1900), 400 pages.

From E.L.Doctorow’s Introduction:

And so in 1899, Theodore Dreiser, age twenty-eight, wrote the title “Sister Carrie” on a piece of paper, and having no idea what it meant, proceeded to compose the book to find out.

Love when I find authors who just write and let stories and characters reveal themselves.

EDITED for quick blurb as to what this is about; stolen word for word from Jill. Link to her review can be found later in this post.

The basic story goes like this: small town girl moves to big city. Finds a menial job, hates it. Gets picked up by a charming salesman, he buys her shiny things, she shacks up with him, the afore-mentioned ass shows up and wants some of that, they plan to runaway together, she finds out he’s married, he kidnaps her and so they still end up running away together, he stops buying her shiny things, he loses his job and stays home in his tatty clothes all day, she becomes an actress, dumps his ass, and buys her own shiny things. Rocking chair. The end.

Trish tweets: “boo!!! … Finished on plane. Did not like ending! So unhappy. 😦 ”

Unhappy? You expected HAPPY?! 

My response: “I took it more contemplative and “far away”. Guess now I will have to do a post. :).

So, I didn’t expect happy. I expected RUIN and SHAME. Well, we don’t quite get that. Ruin, yes: for Mr. Hurstwood. No shame. More like “Shit happens.” Shrug.

The Introduction is fabulous, by the way*. He states, (and Trish? this might explain the theme that runs through it all)

“Longing, the hope for fulfillment is the one unwavering passion of the world’s commerce. Dreiser is of two minds about this passion. To a populace firmly in the grip of material existence, the desire for something more is a destructive energy that can never be exhausted; it is doom. Hurstwood, whose success as manager of  high-class drinking establishments is not sufficient, fixes his further ambition on Carrie, and is ruined. But the desire of something more, the longing for fulfillment, is also hope, and therefore innocence, a sort of redemption. Carrie at the top of her profession, is left looking for something more, and though we understand she will never find it – no more than Hurstwood has, her recognition that she in unfulfilled is the closest thing to grace in the Dreiser theology.”

When I say that I took it “far away”, I meant that I could imagine this on film where the camera zooms out and away from Carrie in her rocking chair to view the entire city, the whole globe spinning away in the ‘longing’ and never finding contentment. This race to achieve and accumulate more more MORE is what is immoral.

I was SO GLAD that Dreiser drops in an update on Mrs. Hurstwood and her success on her material gains goal and I found it humorous that Drouet was still oblivious and yet successful. (He didn’t ‘grow’ but could still dine and dress the fashion.)

I couldn’t get past the pronunciation of Drouet every time I had to read it in my head. Drew – eh?  Of course, I can’t help but think of the chipmonks every time I say Theodore. In my head. THEODORE

The Mr. Ames guy was odd. I get it and I’m sure there is a word for this kind of literary device for dropping in a character to move the story along and be significant but not a major player in the story. But it was odd.

Aw, heck. Carrie was a twit and she annoyed me to NO end. Really, dearheart?  Imagining Carrie’s thoughts: “Oh golly, Mr. Drouet is starting to bore me but I suppose I should be grateful for what nice things he is buying me…”

Word in the Intro states that Mr. Dreiser’s wife and editor tried to totally excise ALL references to any sexuality in book. I would say they succeeded. This was another interesting amusing bit that maybe what was not being mentioned was or was NOT important…  Nothing at all was said! It felt weird that it wasn’t’ intentionally left out but just ‘not there’.

And where the heck is Carrie’s mother? Where is Carrie’s idea that perhaps, something about this plan or LACK of plan might not be a good idea? la di da…    Um wait. Mr. Hurstwood is MARRIED?!?!  why the hell would this little problem bug Carrie so much when all the other little problems barely make a blip of a conscious thought of possible catastrophe?

The story of Carrie is hardly one of right and wrong, is it? Certainly, it’s not presented as a simple morality tale. Was Dreiser judging the basest of desires to be that we can’t be content or that we are too greedy and selfish and maybe we should try to be kinder along the way?

Also interesting to me is that the Introduction states that Family gets a pretty cynical view in this book, too. I would say he was cynical about a lot of things.

AND….  you may have seen my tweet about Dreiser and how he just might subscribe to the Law of Attraction. Or at least to how I understand the explanations of money as energy concept. “When each individual realizes for himself that this thing primarily stands for and should only be accepted as a moral due – that it should be paid out as honestly stored energy, and not as a usurped privilege – man of our social, religious and political trouble will have permanently passed.” Is it our THOUGHTS about what money is or isn’t that is the problem?

Finally, are the descriptions of the “HAVEs” and “HAVE NOTs” any different now versus then? Don’t young girls run off to the big city now and get sucked into a life of depravity just to have lovely trinkets? Too simple, right? Wouldn’t Carrie just be a terrific reality TV star… Um, no. Not sure she would have enough mindless babble for the cameras. But do you think this could EASILY be remade into a film set in today’s world?

Who is ready to watch the 1952 film?  carrie52film I want to see if for the costumes…

I think this book would be an excellent book club choice.

PIE MENTION on page 125: “he stopped with a mouthful of pie poised on a fork before her face.”

Four stars!  fourpie

REVIEW ROUNDUP:
Literary Odyssey
Jill’s Somewhere in a Book
Behold the Stars  <–fabulous and thorough review!!
Trish/TriniCapini’s Love Laughter Insanity
(yours? let me know)

Counts for the What’s in a Name 8 Challenge for family relationship category.

* Who wants my copy of this book – I’ll send it?

Copyright © 2007-2015. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The Count of Monte Cristo

Thoughts TCoMCbyAD Audiobook of 57+ hours. Actually 57 hours and 18 minutes, but I listen at a 1.25x rate…

Though I mentioned before that this narrator will likely make my worst-ever list, I have one word to describe the story and what I thought of this experience:

AWESOME.

HIdeinWhitetoSkipLine

Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Thoughts ikwtcbsbyma by Maya Angelou, Random House Audio 2011 (1970 orig) 10 hours 12 minutes

Narrated by Maya Angelou.

Um, I had thought this book was a book of poetry. Perhaps because all I really thought I knew about Maya Angelou is that she was a poet? I really am not that familiar with her but have no reason not to admire her. This book proves that she is the product of some fabulous female influences and strong personal will to survive horrific and unfortunate experiences.

This is a memoir of her first 18 years. (In case anyone else also thought it was a book of poetry.)

I may not go out of my way to listen to her narrate any other works of literature but having her read her own words was just fine for me.

Rating: Five slices of pie.

HIdeinWhitetoSkipLine

Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Slaughterhouse-Five

Thoughts shfbykv Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, RosettaBooks 2010 (orig 1969), 285 pages

For the What’s in a Name 7 Challenge.
Number in Letters category
First book of six.

A reread. First experienced in the early 80s.

FIRST Sentence:  “This all happened, more or less.”

What’s it ABOUT: This is a book about one guy’s experience in World War II, specifically about being an American POW, witnessing the bombing of Dresden, living a normal life after the war and time travel. Tell me again, what is a normal life?

“And so it goes.”

What’s GOOD: Vonnegut’s “la di da” tone of ambivalence towards everything, tragic and not, and yet still being able to call attention to the true horrors of war. He states things that happen with little added emotional emphasis. He is sympathetic but not sentimental.

It is comic in many many places. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this non-linear, meta-fictional, historically educational (accuracy is debatable), crazy story full of fascinating characters. This book is listed 18th on the 100 best English-language books of the 20th century (Modern Library, 1998).  It has been often criticized and banned from schools and people have gone so far as to claim the time-travel elements ‘don’t work’. (See the Wikipedia page, Criticism section.) Whatever – how do they know if time travel works?! I enjoyed it very much. I love time travel books.

RATING:  Five slices of pie. Grape and Peanut Butter Pie.  photo-78

I adored and devoured all of Vonnegut’s book when in High School. I don’t remember why so I wanted to revisit a few. I *think*, maybe?, that Cat’s Cradle was my favorite. I wish I had kept a book blog then. I can’t even find much mention of the books I read in any of my journals.

Are you a Vonnegut fan? Have you seen the movie of this book?

Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Harry Potter. The Finale.

hpathbp hpatdhbyjkr

I’m done! I’ve read them ALL!  I’m thrilled to have this personal challenge complete. Thank you to everyone who has cheered me to this finish line, who encouraged me to keep at it, who loaned me copies of their own books or even just considered and decided I was not worth the risk. Thank you to everyone who envied my reading-for-the-first-time because once done, can never be done again. And thank you to the few of you who wondered why I would bother. I did it!  I enjoyed the whole experience.

I feel this to be a tremendous accomplishment. I’m quite proud of myself.  It only took me 16 months (funny, I thought it took longer.) I sought out borrowed non-library books, by the way. I had book #7 waiting a long time and then suddenly over Columbus Day I was presented with book #6 and swoooosh! I was done. They read SO fast.

I am not going to bother with any review. I liked the stories and loved the characters and even cried a little at the very end.

Now I get to watch the movies!

H

H

PS – After finishing book #7 but still not having a very good memory of what number is which title and late the night I decided I should watch a movie, I couldn’t figure out which of the films I’m supposed to watch next since they don’t put the number in IMDB… I decided to watch the one with Sirius Black. Had NO idea that it would be the scary mean guy from The Professional (must see if you never have – Jean Reno as the ‘good’ guy and a young Natalie Portman – a top 5 favorite movie for me. I wonder if it is based on a book; must find out…) and of course — GARY OLDMAN! A nice surprise. But the movie was TOO SHORT.

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Copyright © 2007-2013. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Tropic of Cancer (eBook & Audio)

Thoughts  tocbyhm Tropic of Cancer by Henry Miller, Grove Press 1961 (orig 1934), 318 pages

tofcaudionbycs Narrated by Campbell Scott, Harper Audio 2008, 10 hours

For the John Cusack Reading Challenge

The blurb from goodreads:  Now hailed as an American classic, Tropic of Cancer, Henry Miller’s masterpiece, was banned as obscene in this country for twenty-seven years after its first publication in Paris in 1934. Only a historic court ruling that changed American censorship standards, ushering in a new era of freedom and frankness in modern literature, permitted the publication of this first volume of Miller’s famed mixture of memoir and fiction, which chronicles with unapologetic gusto the bawdy adventures of a young expatriate writer, his friends, and the characters they meet in Paris in the 1930s. Tropic of Cancer is now considered, as Norman Mailer said, one of the ten or twenty great novels of our century.”

WHAT it’s ABOUT: Well…

If you are completely new to this, I shall tell you that this book is somewhat autobiographical of Henry’s struggling writer days in France, mostly Paris. If you have ideals and dreams to be a writer in Paris, you might want to experience this book. It does include descriptions of the city plus a myriad of thoughts on a variety of topics; a lot of musings about being poor and wanting to be a writer and how depraved the world is. Set in the Thirties, one might not expect all the sexual adventures that Mr. Miller shares but then one – or is it only me? – is often reminded that just because a book is set in “OLDER TIMES” does not mean people were always good, chaste and respectable. Not that I would use those descriptions to describe any era, but I do admit that I view the past, the “good ol’ days” as being more wholesome and less crazy. This book should change your mind – I admit to being shocked. (yep, still clinging to my naïveté.)

Sir Alexander Cockburn, the Lord Chief Justice of England said,

“I think the test of obscenity is this: whether the tendency of the matter charged as obscenity is to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences, and into whose hands a publication of this sort may fall.”

– the Hicklin Rule (1868)

If you DO know what this book is about and think you are not sure you would ever want to read it, I suggest the audio. I wonder if I would have finished this if I had only read the print. On the other hand, I am glad I have the eBook to refer to now. And if you care not to read blunt descriptions of the sexual act(s), perhaps this is not a book for you.

“And there are of course, many people who are genuinely repelled by the simplest and most natural stirring of sexual feeling. But these people are perverts who have fallen into hatred of their fellow man: thwarted, disappointed, unfulfilled people, of whom, alas, our civilization contains so many.”

– D. H. Lawrence

What’s GOOD: Henry Miller did have a talent for creating mood and atmosphere with words.

“The night hung close, dagger-pointed, drunk as a maniac. There it was, the infinitude of emptiness. Over the chapel, like a bishop’s miter, hung the constellation, every night, during the winter months. It hung there low over the chapel. Low and bright, a handful of dagger points, a dazzle of pure emptiness. The old fellow followed me to the turn of the drive. The door closed silently. As I bade him good night I caught that desperate, hopeless smile again, like a meteoric flash over the rim of a lost world.”

I might also be tempted to say that sometimes it felt like bad performance art. But sometimes, it was amazingly achingly hauntingly beautiful.

I am now more interested in reading about Anaïs Nin:

“If there is here revealed a capacity to shock, to startle the lifeless ones from their profound slumber, let us congratulate ourselves; for the tragedy of our world is precisely that nothing any longer is capable of rousing it from its lethargy. No more violent dreams, no refreshment, no awakening. In the anaesthesia produces by self-knowledge, life is passing, art is passing, slipping from us: we are drifting with time and our fight is with shadows. We need a blood transfusion.”

FINAL Thoughts: Not for the faint of heart. For those who are inquisitive of the controversial classics that many say are MUST-READS. For adventuresome souls who want to read all about “Writers in Paris”.

RATING:  Three slices of pie and a shot of Pernod.

Click on this image of the original book cover to go to Wiki and read more: TropicOfCancer

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Copyright © 2007-2013. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Speak

Thoughts speakbylha Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson, publisher??? (orig 1999), 198 pages (according to the goodreads page I link to here from the book cover image)

I subbed last week for an English teacher. For two of her classes, I led vocabulary discussion of Speak; covering a range of pages in the first third of the book, pushed play on the audio CD and then passed out a questionnaire. LOVE! I can’t truthfully admit that I read every word but I skimmed through and hit many highlights and read the last few pages desperately and thoroughly engaged. Tears in my eyes.

NOTE: in another class that day, I read aloud from The Face on the Milk Carton by Caroline B Cooney but was not capable of finishing that one by skimming. I want/need to get back to this one! Also, it was Read Aloud Day and I was very excited to have been able to participate.

Back to Speak. What a great book! I feel privileged to be a part of sharing such important relevant books with our young people.

If you don’t know, I will spoil it all for you. Don’t HIGHLIGHT if you don’t want to know. This is a book about a young girl who was raped at an end-of-summer party and calls 911. The cops break up the party and so now all the kids hate her. She ended up running after placing the call so NO ONE KNOWS. She does not understand clearly what happened, how it happened and certainly not the best way to deal with it. She turns inward and SILENT. She starts high school – never easy but now she is considered a freak, she has no friends and — oh! it’s just so hard!  
 

And I am sad that the author tells in the back of the book that she often has students ask her why the girl didn’t just enjoy being assaulted. Whoa. Seriously messed up. Bless authors and teachers for presenting these tough subjects through literature.

And now a fun quote about pie!

“Oh, if you put it in a slice of pumpkin pie, it could be a desserted island!”  -p64

Four slices of Pumpkin Pie (page 64) fourpie

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Copyright © 2007-2013. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Banned Books Dueling #MonsterMash

 <– BookJourney is sponsoring all sorts of fun for this week, Banned Books Week. Click on the button.

  Estella Society is sponsoring the Dueling Monster fun. Click here –>  

Something a little different from my usual THOUGHTS on a book and so I will combine my Banned Book post with the Dueling Monster Mashup.

Thoughts  American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis, Brilliance Audio (orig 1991), 10 hours

I only hope and assume that this book is not recommended reading for anyone under the age of 35. Even Stephen King has expressed reservations about this book being on the shelves of a middle school library. Not that I condone any books being banned but this one is extremely violent and X rated. NOT for the squeamish. But it also serves as a scathing indictment to consumerism and materialistic narcissism. Point is you make your own choice to read or not; you don’t get to choose that someone else doesn’t have that choice.

I did enjoy or rather credit Pablo Schreiber as an excellent narrator for the novel. I admit that I skipped over the middle half of the book. I only hope I did miss something but I don’t think so.

“Is evil something you are? or something you do? My pain is constant and sharp and I do not hope for a better world for anyone. In fact, I want my pain to be inflicted on others.”
– quote from character Bateman, ~83% in

For the other monster contender, I read  Red Dragon by Thomas Harris, Random House 1981, 455 pages, paperback.

I am voting / selecting / cheering for Monster Hannibal Lector in this duel and I will explain despite issues.

Issue #1 – I don’t think Red Dragon is really about Hannibal Lector since he is barely a supporting cast member in the crime drama.

Issue #2 – Red Dragon was rather procedural, almost a typical crime drama book. One more “weary-detective-pulled-back-into-duty-catches-bad-guy” and though I waffle on rating it  3 or 4 slices of pie, it is a whole ‘nother kind of book compared to American Psycho. I ‘get’ why but not sure I can explain nor defend it. Let’s just say, Red Dragon was well done but not a masterpiece. I didn’t feel like I needed to take a shower while reading it. AP is just gross and icky but scarily relevant about some aspects of ‘society’.

Issue #3 – Having no one to clarify what the criteria is for exactly how to vote for a winner in Dueling Monsters, I decided to use my own criteria. And since Red Dragon didn’t make me feel as nauseous, I hereby declare Hannibal my winner.

Reason #1 – I read every word of Red Dragon. I have no desire to read every word (or any more words) of American Psycho. So, point for Hannibal.

Reason #2 – I had a postcard of Blake’s painting of Red Dragon and Woman Clothed by the Sun. [I think I mailed it to Jeanne but I’m not sure.] Anywhoosie, point is and point for Hannibal is that I already had a book blogging ‘tie’ into the Red Dragon book by this piece of correspondence.

Reason #3 – I have decided – oh, let it be known that AP ends ambiguously – that Bateman’s serial killing was purely(?) his own fantasy and thus he didn’t really commit the crimes thus making him more harmless than Hannibal Lector. Before you c0unter that we are discussing fictional characters, I remind you that WITHIN the STORY, Hannibal was ‘real’ but Bateman’s crimes were fictional within the American Psycho fictional world. So there.

Now, may I please put this behind me and move on to butterflies, unicorns and daisies? puppies and bunny rabbits and sunny sunshine?

HIdeinWhitetoSkipLine

Copyright © 2007-2012. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.