Archive for the '1001 Books To Read Before Dying' Category

East of Eden

Thoughts eoebyjs by John Steinbeck, Penguin Books 2002 (orig 1952), 601 pages, Tradeback AND Audiobook (narrated by Richard Poe, 25’28”)

So GOOD. Amazing work of fiction. Thank you Estella for suggesting I read along! EastofEdenReadalong-1024x1024

Page 255 – “What is there to understand? Just read it. If the Lord God wanted you to understand it He’d have given you to understand or He’d have set it down different.” (Amen Liz!)

Five slices of pie.

Five juicy perfectly-pastried slices of plum pie. With home-made vanilla ice cream from a hand-crank ice cream maker. Why plum? because something about this book reminds me of sandhill plums. I couldn’t find any reference to the possibility of these kinds of plums being found in Salinas Valley CA but who cares. I apparently found (or recorded) only one reference to pie in this amazing work of fiction. (TSBOOToTaOBtRBYDB!)

Page 494 – “I am so cowardly. I will not put my finger in any human pie.” (Lee – one of the BEST characters EVER. Samuel is close second.)

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Page 509 – “That smart little son of a bitch – wrong word – must not call him that.” (Cathy – one of the most despicable characters EVER. Just whoa.)

If you like epics and stories of good versus evil with some startlingly clear and wise statements about humanity that don’t beat you on the head but just suggest, then you will appreciate this story. It has everything and Steinbeck achieves this masterfully.

Thoroughly enjoyable on all of my what-I-love-about-fiction buttons.

NOT intimidating. In fact, I am not sure what symbols I missed. Steinbeck LOVES his symbolism, doesn’t he? Oh well.

What I love about reading, especially with historical glimpses into the human condition, is that I get to realize that times have always been NUTS, people have always had its crazies and its wonders, and NOW isn’t anything special or more crazy worse or whatever. Olden days weren’t nicer or better or anything. Life is messy. And we’ve been on this path for a long, long time.

Page 494 – “Laughter comes later, like wisdom teeth, and laughter at yourself comes last of all in a mad race with death,…”

TSBOOToTaOBtRBYDB = This Should Be One of the One Thousand and One Books to Read Before You Die Books.

BEST WORDS EVER!  “Bumptiousness” – page 215

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I still have no interest in reading The Grapes of Wrath even though it won the Pulitzer. You can’t make me.

But I’ll agree to think about it.

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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

East of Eden, Part 1 and then some

Hello,

I am LOVING East of Eden by John Steinbeck. As I have it on audio and it has been a fabulous escape from the real life, I have zoomed ahead and am into the last quarter of the book! I have 5 hours left on a 25.5 hours audiobook. I am in Chapter 42.

I am fabulously impressed. I don’t know why I was so reluctant to read this.

EastofEdenReadalong-1024x1024

“It would be absurd if we did not understand both angels and devils, since we invented them.” 


― John SteinbeckEast of Eden

That said, and if you are still here, allow me to tell you what is going on in the ‘real’ parts of my awake living (and some of my sleeping dreaming time, too.)

We are moving to North Carolina sometime this fall if all goes well. Which it should. No reason all won’t be hunky-dory but as moving is always an adventure, I will just share our new motto:  “We’ll figure it out.”

I have my final project due Sunday in my grad class that I’m taking right now. I have company coming this weekend. My husband is ‘on vacation’. I am trying to ready my house to list (I am cleaning and de-cluttering and then some). I am making phone calls and setting up appointments for painters and septic inspectors and lawn care and storage units, etc.) Oscar has pulled a muscle in his neck and yelps every time he moves.

Never a dull moment.

loveCare

 

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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Books in the House

I thought I posted this! Oooops. I’m going through my post drafts.

photo-85

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – FINALLY. And links well to my Bryson A Walk in the Woods (doh – hiking.)

James and the Giant Peach – gift from a friend, read and probably won’t review

Out of My Mind by Sharon M Draper – YA, loaned by a friend

Michael Chabon’s Pulitzer Winner The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay - Thanks Fizzy! I’m a bit intimidated, actually.

Home by Marilynn Robinson, because I was so impressed with Gilead. Purchased at an Independent Book Store Bargain Shelf “Previously Read”.

East of Eden – Readalong!!!

The Secret Life of Violet Grant – selected solely on loving the name/color Violet.

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More random stuff about books and reading:

I have pushed on with my audiobook of The Count of Monte Cristo and despite the. halting. odd intonations. of. the narrATOR! I am quite swept up in the story and even dreamed about Royalist vs Bonapartist ideology. Yikes, right?

“Oh the heartless scoundrels!  … Is the world filled with tigers and crocodiles?!”

I downloaded the audiobook for East of Eden. Ready to go!

A long time ago which I failed to note with my not quite established habit to secure a post-it note in the front cover of books loaned to me, MBR gave me Bill Bryson’s A Walk in the Woods. I have dipped into it often but it never ‘took’. Finally, I left it at the treadmill and have been regularly reading as I walk the Weight Loss 2 setting (30 minutes, ~1.72 miles) and now I’m on a push to finish the damn thing. I’m on to the Massachusetts chapter, about 25% remains. Though I have heard it is SO FUNNY, I’m actually finding it quite sad. The Park Service has limited funds or misuses it, the aphids are eating the hemlocks, unsolved brutal murders…  I have no ambitions to hike the AT but I am inspired to visit Mt. Greylock in Mass.

Side note: yesterday, I read about his visit to Harper’s Ferry and, of course, the name John Brown was mentioned. That is more motivation or a clue to get McBride’s The Good Lord Bird. (If any of my family is reading this, think Christmas present.)

School started two days ago. I will be alternating between feeling successful that I finished a project on time and stressing about doing such  — over the next four weeks. Right now I’m on the happy side of that pendulum. I have nothing due for two days and it is only commenting/responding. I suppose I should read what will come after that…

I got me a new laptop! A Microsoft Lenovo ThinkPad just so I can practice on this style – nothing more embarrassing than to sit at somebody’s computer and not know how to work that crazy mouse. I need to be fluent in all kinds computers for my job. I’m excited to play with it. I will create a nutty picture doing my homework surrounded by a Macbook, a ThinkPad, two iPads and an iPhone just to search the internet. I’m SO prepared. Bring it on.

Also yesterday (yesterday was a kick ass day overall – did lots of good things), I read on Iris’ blog that she has exceeded the 100 book count on the list of 1001 Books to Read Before You Die and it occurred to me that I didn’t know MY count. According to my shelf in goodreads, I’m at 50. But that might not be all on the READ shelf, so I am astonished at 100+. Way to go!

OK, this was supposed to be a short update post. Gotta run.

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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Films: Brideshead Revisited

The Film(s):  Brideshead Revisited.

The Book: Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh. My book review here.

EXTRA CREDIT for THE CLASSICS CHALLENGE

I watched two film versions of Brideshead Revisited, though how many minutes I actually viewed could be debated. What is skimming called when applied to visual viewing?

I first watched the most recent one: fbr2008 2008

I thought this well-cast. Of course, Emma Thomson was great. The film evoked the same mood of the book. It was visually stunning – as the wealth of that era might suggest it should.

Then I rented the mulit-CD mini-series from the library: fbr1981 1981

and really liked this Sebastian Flyte! Another ‘of course’ for Jeremy Irons doing a fabulous job.

Now that it has been months since the viewing experience, I can’t think of more to add. Can’t say it was a favorite book but I ‘get’ how this might be considered a classic, especially the exploration of many deep themes. A book that most possibly could be interpreted on many levels for those intellectual (geeky?) enough to enjoy the process. Religion, sexuality, family duty, etc. Did the movies make me want to re-read it? No. Not that they weren’t acceptable adaptions, but no. I’ve seen enough of it now.

OK, this concludes my ‘extra’ credit for participation in the Classics Challenge! Yay, me.

As for my next book-to-film, I am scheduled to see The Book Thief soon and I really do want to see Catching Fire and Divergent. So many movies based on novels that I hope to see someday. Which one are you most excited about? Noah, anyone? The Fault in Our Stars?! Gone Girl or Dark Places, Unbroken!, The Giver, Wild (did you know A Walk in the Woods is also being worked on?), If I Stay, ahhhhh: Therese Raquin. And books I still need to read first: Serena, This is Where I Leave You (of course:  Jason Bateman), Far From the Madding Crowd, A Book of Common Prayer, and not sure about Devil’s Knot (scary). So many!

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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Three Men in a Boat

Thoughts tmiabbyjkj Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome, ebook/orig 1889, 256 pages

FITS the Classics Challenge AND the What’s In a Name Challenge – not sure yet where it will fall.

If one were to ask me why I read this book, I could list many  a reason. One, it’s got BOAT in the title. I like boats.

It fits my classic challenge – not sure yet which category but maybe the 19th century one? It is a HUMOR book – I don’t read much in this genre, but what’s not to like when a book can make you laugh? But the main reason is probably because this book is what Connie Willis based her (or references? or __?…  not sure exactly because I have yet to read) book title To Say Nothing of the Dog. I like dogs. I want to read a Willis book. She has been on my “Author I Must Get To” list for years now. Maybe this will be THE YEAR.

I must say, the dog in Three Men in a Boat is terrific. A true dog’s dog.

Oh, and I did laugh! often, actually. tmiab4

I should change this post to be of the interview style. I have lots of questions.

Why did I read this book now? THAT is the hardest question. It just came to be. I actually downloaded the free ebook version many months ago and something conspired in the cosmos that I should read it in March of 2014.

What did I think of the book? I liked it. However, it got old. I needed to be way shorter. I guess I can be that person who appreciates the non-plot meandering wayward adventure mishap and funny situation comedy feel of this; just a few guys taking a boat trip together. It’s fun, it’s funny, but it gets old and I couldn’t wait for it to end. I was about a third of the way through when THAT FEELING came up. tmiab3

What IS “THAT FEELING”? When I start wondering about a book. Am I getting it? Is it going to wrap up soon? Can we get a few more passages devoted to the dog?

What happens when you get THAT FEELING? Well, this is when I start looking for other reviews of the book, either from Fyrefly’s google search of book blogger reviews or on goodreads.com. I then check to see how my friends rated it and then I read through some reviews. If it is a print book, this is when I allow myself to read the blurb on the back of the book or inside flap or – kiss of death, usually – I read the… INTRODUCTION.

And then what happens?  I either give up or I keep going. Oftentimes, neither of these choices ends up in a higher rating than a THREE slicer or star.

How will you rate this one?  I give it THREE SLICES of meat pie. The book did have a plethora of pie references. Any book that allows me to use the word ‘plethora’ in a review also earns it high marks. In fact, for that, it might be a 4 slicer! LOTS of pie. Most of them meat pies which is typical of British food fare. Nothing wrong with that.

But wait! What’s it about? I think I said that already, didn’t I?  It’s about three guys and a dog that take a vacation trip on a boat on the Thames River. It’s British. It’s FULL of English history – which I admit was kind of cool. It really could be described as a travel book – if you were able to cruise the Thames in the late 19th century. Many of the adventures could still happen today though, I suppose – who hates to pack for a trip, am I right?

Would you recommend this book? Actually, I can give this question a resounding YES. If you love British humour, read this. If you want to read the Connie Willis book with me as a read-along, yes. If you are trying to read all the 1001 Books to Read Before You Die, then this makes the list and I bet there are worse (ie, more difficult) books on that list. If you like British history, and probably? especially? British literature, I bet this should be on a required reading list somewhere. If the author’s name, Jerome K. Jerome, appeals to you, you might want to read this book. His name appeals to me. I knew a girl in High School whose first name was also her last name and I won’t tell you what it was but it was kind of like Mary Mary, but it wasn’t Mary. I wouldn’t want her to google herself and find that I talked about her!

tmiab2

Do you have anything else to add? Yes, I do. I read on and will admit I skimmed to, a passage about a woman who suffered. A comment on a goodreads review, mentioned that Jerome had biting commentary to provide about society and that it was highlighted with this passage. The woman had found herself “in trouble” and then being scorned and finding it tremendously difficult to support herself and her child given the times, that society’s scorn, etc, she drowned herself in the river. It was poignant.

Much of the writing, the descriptions, the British humor (of course) proves Jerome’s skill as a writer. I don’t and won’t deny him that. Though I failed to find the full tasting of this work to be a total pleasure, I am very glad to have read it and do think I will think often upon it. That is high praise of the best reader’s kind. Books can’t all hit the bells on all levels  at all times for all moods but they can be appreciated for it all anyway. I love this kind of books – the ones that make me think and feel. Golly, I might have to bump it up to a four.

“Supper was not a success. Cold veal pie, when you don’t feel hungry, is apt to cloy. I felt I wanted whitebait and a cutlet; Harris babbled of soles and white-sauce, and passed the remains of his pie to Montmorency, who declined it, and apparently insulted by the offer, went and sat over at the other end of the boat by himself.”  p.187

OK, who read all the way to —> here?? <– and might want to join me for a readalong of To Say Nothing of the Dog?  Or Doomsday? I so want to read that one, too!!!  Sigh….

If you have read Willis and you ‘know’ me, do you think I will like her books?

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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Therese Raquin

Thoughts trbyez trbyezgr

Thérèse Raquin

    • Written by: Emile Zola (Translated from French)
    • Narrated by: Kate Winslet
    • Length: 8 hrs
    • Format: Unabridged
  • Release Date:03-08-12 (originally pub’d 1867)
  • Publisher: Audible, Inc.
  • Program Type: Audiobook

FOR THE CLASSICS CHALLENGE: Author New to Me Category

Often repeated phrase:  Hither and thither.

This extremely dark story is INTENSE.

A young woman, Thérèse, is trapped in a loveless marriage; she hides her seething contempt well. When her husband, Camille, brings home a friend named Laurent, she secretly unleashes her duplicitous passionate side, Laurent is a non-ambitious lollygagger of a sort; he really only wishes to see if he could shag her. Dark deeds, mayhem and madness ensue.

“He enjoyed gentle quietude; waiting for the hour to strike.”

Not for the faint of heart.

I’m really not sure what Zola was trying to say. That crime never goes unpunished? That we really can’t tell what goes on in the hearts of others? That we should be content with our lot in life or else we’ll only get misery? – NO, not that last one… Perhaps, it is to never trust a cat.

Rating THREE STARS. I realize and I get that this is a classic but not my favorite. Well-written, amazingly paced, fascinating exploration of the depths of madness = imagination, etc. But I found it rather tedious once the madness ball started rolling hither and thither. Yes, I was distracted by the number of times I heard the phrase.

“That woman must have intoxicated me with caresses.”

Winslet’s narration is top-notch.

No pie, that I recall. Hard to say since it was audio and I listen in my car. Just not wise of me to take a note.

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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Slaughterhouse-Five

Thoughts shfbykv Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, RosettaBooks 2010 (orig 1969), 285 pages

For the What’s in a Name 7 Challenge.
Number in Letters category
First book of six.

A reread. First experienced in the early 80s.

FIRST Sentence:  “This all happened, more or less.”

What’s it ABOUT: This is a book about one guy’s experience in World War II, specifically about being an American POW, witnessing the bombing of Dresden, living a normal life after the war and time travel. Tell me again, what is a normal life?

“And so it goes.”

What’s GOOD: Vonnegut’s “la di da” tone of ambivalence towards everything, tragic and not, and yet still being able to call attention to the true horrors of war. He states things that happen with little added emotional emphasis. He is sympathetic but not sentimental.

It is comic in many many places. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this non-linear, meta-fictional, historically educational (accuracy is debatable), crazy story full of fascinating characters. This book is listed 18th on the 100 best English-language books of the 20th century (Modern Library, 1998).  It has been often criticized and banned from schools and people have gone so far as to claim the time-travel elements ‘don’t work’. (See the Wikipedia page, Criticism section.) Whatever – how do they know if time travel works?! I enjoyed it very much. I love time travel books.

RATING:  Five slices of pie. Grape and Peanut Butter Pie.  photo-78

I adored and devoured all of Vonnegut’s book when in High School. I don’t remember why so I wanted to revisit a few. I *think*, maybe?, that Cat’s Cradle was my favorite. I wish I had kept a book blog then. I can’t even find much mention of the books I read in any of my journals.

Are you a Vonnegut fan? Have you seen the movie of this book?

Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

The Garden Party and Other Stories

Thoughts tgpbykm The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield, Kindle Edition 2012 (Orig 1922), 192 pages

A lovely LOVELY collection! Though it has been well over a month since I read this, I can still recall the wit and deep meaning wrapped up into interesting little stories. I can see why Virginia Woolf would admire her writing; they were in the same ‘set’ of modernist writers so says Wikipedia. I must finally get to my bio of Woolf so I can find out more. I really didn’t know anything about Katherine Mansfield before researching books for the Classics Challenge and seeing this on the list of Books To Read Before I Die.

180px-Katherinemansfield She died young; age 34 in 1923.

The Garden Party was my favorite of the stories – masterful! A wealthy family plans a picnic when a poor neighbor suffers a tragedy. The debate begins of whether or not it is proper to continue with the party. Well, of course it is. Right? No answers, just interesting thoughts and contrasts on sensitivity of youth and propriety. Complex and insightful; very easy to read.

Recommended.  FREE eBooks available.

Read for the Classics Challenge – Woman Author Category.

“Laurie put his arm round her shoulder. “Don’t cry,” he said in his warm, loving voice. “Was it awful?”

“No,” sobbed Laura. “It was simply marvellous. But Laurie—” She stopped, she looked at her brother. “Isn’t life,” she stammered, “isn’t life— ” But what life was she couldn’t explain. No matter. He quite understood.

“Isn’t it, darling?” said Laurie.

fourpie

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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Like Water for Chocolate

Thoughts lwfcbyle Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel, Anchor Books 1995 (orig 1989), 246 pages.

FIRST sentence: “Take care to chop the onion fine.”

THREE words:  Passionate, fierce, independent.

What’s it ABOUT: A young girl grows up in a kitchen, falls in love, fights her fate, and cooks up magical treats.

I have two reasons for wanting to read this book:  it has recipes and I wanted to know what the title meant.

OK, I do seem to enjoy the foodie books even though I don’t seek them out. I should. I see a pattern. Give in to it already. I love that each chapter of this story revolved or involved a recipe of some sort. I may  not actually try cooking any but I did enjoy reading through the ingredients and the process.

What was most enjoyable was the results described when eating Tita’s concoctions!  I did mention magic, did I not? Wonderful magic, unquestioned, just accepted, not fancy but so revealing. This was such a fun little book!

The book cover calls it a romance but do not let that throw you off. Tita is very much a strong girl who accepts hardwork but fights for what she believes it. When circumstances and family decide things that are not to her liking, she accepts but never ever bends. Yes, there is love and passion and passionate reactions. Love of all forms is explored.

Tita’s sister is also a delight. Well, ONE of her sisters, anyway.

I think this an excellent choice for a book club.

I am also very glad that I can show off that I have read another book off my physical book hoarding shelf. CHECK. It’s a book that is on the 1001+ Books to Read Before I Die. YAY! It’s a book that was translated – from Spanish. I’m doing good for exploring more of my planet. It’s a book that has been made into a movie! I can’t wait to see how it translates to film.

Have you read this? Have you seen the movie? Do you have any other FOODie books to recommend?

RATING:   FOUR slices of chocolate cream pie with loads of whipped cream and a few strawberries and maybe rose petals.
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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club. It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

Brideshead Revisited

Thoughts IMG_2529 Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh, GK Hall Large Print Books 1982 (orig 1944) 505 pages

This book was swiped from the library of a nursing home where I was charged to make room for new donations. I will return it!

For the CLASSICS CHALLENGE 2014

Wordlily asked me on Twitter if this book was good. I tweeted a reply,

“BR is interesting and layered and complex and frustrating.”

I was on page 300 when I gave those four words and now that I have finished it, these words still apply. This is one of those books where I wonder if I’m just not smart enough to get it. OR British. Both?  So many British places and references to things I have no clue, like the English school system and descriptions of ‘Hogarthian’.

I was very confused in the beginning as to where our narrator was physically. It took some time to realize that he was with the army but still in England. They get transferred and ordered to setup camp somewhere when he realizes that the place is not just somewhere but BRIDESHEAD – a magnificent castle. We then go into all his memories about the place and the family that lived there.

“I had felt the brush take life in my hand that afternoon; I had had my finger in the great, succulent pie of creation.”

Mr. Waugh does have a way with words. His sentences were beautiful and evocative. He is excellent at setting a scene and creating a mood. But  he is also vague, at times wry and caustic. I didn’t trust him.

And plot? I have no idea what this really was about, what was going on and what really motivated our narrator.

It’s usually not a good sign when in the middle of a book, I start reading reviews in blogland and in goodreads because I risk finding people who hate it or give away spoilers or read things into it that I’m not seeing. Which is what happened but it also made me want to keep reading which is often not the result of such exploration.

Charles Ryder is our narrator and we first meet him his first year at Oxford. He meets and is entranced by the lively Sebastian Flyte and they become best of friends. Sebastian’s family has a home called Brideshead. He also has a brother named Brideshead. His father is Lord Marchmain. (I never did figure out all the names but I think it likely it’s because of all the titles????) Sebastian has a sister. Actually he has two sisters. This family is Catholic. Our narrator is not Catholic and thinks it all rather like witchcraft or nonsense.

Oh, yes; lots of different things going on. Was our narrator jealous of the lifestyle and wealth of the Brideshead family? Was he ‘in love’ with Sebastian or just wanted to be him? Why was Sebastian such a wreck? I don’t know, it all felt like a big drama mama tragedy and it has left me cold. I almost gave it three stars but I do think the writing was captivating. I just am not sure what to do with the characters, how I felt about any of them and what it all meant. Maybe nothing. Was Charles an unreliable narrator? I think yes. (But I really only just came to that conclusion.)

It does have comic moments. Comic might not be the best word but funny/odd, sarcasm, wit. But mostly just sadness.

To finalize, if you love classics and big grand sweeping messy themes, do read this. If you don’t read classics because of big grand sweeping convoluted themes and the HUH? of it all, skip this.  We’ll see how I feel after I watch the movie from 2008 starring Emma Thomson. I also hope to get my hands on the miniseries from 1981 starring Jeremy Irons.

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DO TELL! DID I GET IT WRONG? DID I MISS SOMETHING?

VOCAB
p.56 – subfusc – dull, gloomy – “Jasper’s subfusc suit and white tie proclaimed him still in the thick of it; he had, too, the exhausted but resentful air of one who fears he has failed to do himself full justice on the subject of Pindar’s Orphism.”

p.59 noisome – extremely unpleasant, obnoxious – “Or that peculiarly noisome object?” (A human skull lately purchased from the School of Medicine, which, resting in a bowl of roses, formed, at the moment, the chief decoration of my table.)

p323 afllatus – a divine imparting of  knowledge or power – “These hours of afflatus in the human spirit, the springs of art, are, in their mystery, akin to the epochs of history, when a race which for centuries has lived content, unknown, behind its own frontiers, digging, eating, sleeping, begetting, doing what was requisite for survival and nothing else, will, for a generation or two, stupefy the world, commit all manner of crimes, perhaps; follow the wildest chimeras, go down in the end in agony, but leave behind a record of new heights scale and new rewards won for all mankind, the vision fades, the soul sickens, and the routine of survival starts again.

“I have left behind illusion,” I said to myself. “Henceforth I live in a world of three dimensions – with the aid of my five senses.”  

I have since learned that there is no such world…

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Copyright © 2007-2014. Care’s Online Book Club. All rights reserved. This post was originally posted by Care from Care’s Online Book Club.  It should not be reproduced without express written permission.

I prefer pi.

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